11

The mosaic has a Projected (Equidistant Cyclindrical) CRS. We can check it with: gdalinfo Pluto_NewHorizons_Global_Mosaic_300m_Jul2017_8bit.tif Prints: Driver: GTiff/GeoTIFF Files: Pluto_NewHorizons_Global_Mosaic_300m_Jul2017_8bit.tif Size is 24888, 12444 Coordinate System is: PROJCRS["SimpleCylindrical Pluto", BASEGEOGCRS["GCS_Pluto", ...


10

QGIS is a free, open source GIS. It can be downloaded at https://qgis.org/en/site/forusers/download.html. The program comes with some tutorials, including how to create a shapefile. This is the link https://docs.qgis.org/2.8/en/docs/training_manual/create_vector_data/create_new_vector.html.


10

This is something a lot of people struggle with when they are not use to the various file formats that GIS and particularly QGIS can accept. Other than giving it a quick Google you can use QGIS browser to load the particular files in as it will only list the files that have a valid format for importing. To get the browser panel right click on anywhere on ...


9

Hover on top of the selection and you'll see a short context help text. QGIS creates new fields by default wide so that attributes have enough space to fit in. When saving it is possible to analyze the attributes and shorten the fields and save some disk space because the .dbf part will be smaller. You can select YES if you know that there is no need to ...


8

There is no export to shapefile via Google Earth. These steps when using the Google Earth web version: Once you are in the project section, you can click on the three vertical dots and then export as KML file as mentioned on this thread These steps when using Earth Pro desktop version: You will need to right-click the polygon layer, then click on Save As ...


8

The "equate" in your title is probably too strong a representation for a document which uses "roughly 70 million" points. The maximum file size for a .shp or .shx is 231-2, not 231, because Esri chose to keep the 231-1 filesystem limitations in existence when the format was published (see this question/answer), and the 16-bit word size assures that the file ...


8

Shapefiles require three files (ESRI Shapefile Technical Description): main file; example.shp index file; example.shx dBASE table; example.dbf An ESRI shapefile consists of a main file, an index file, and a dBASE table. The main file is a direct access, variable-record-length file in which each record describes a shape with a list of its vertices. In the ...


7

In QGIS, you can find a tool in Vector/Data Management Tools/Split Vector Layer. There you can define the column containing the species information as Unique ID field and it will generate a new file for each category in the output directory.


7

GDAL supports two SQL dialects which can be used for all data sources. In addition to those two for some databases (Oracle, PostgeSQL etc.) the native SQL can be utilized. The OGR SQL dialect https://gdal.org/user/ogr_sql_dialect.html is made by the GDAL project and it is not at all a full featured SQL language. The other SQL dialect https://gdal.org/user/...


7

Another way, using the same method as presented above by Joseph, with a slightly shorter code: if(LABEL % 10 = 5,"","LABEL") When the remainder of dividing by 10 is 5 (so 5, 15, 25...) it won't show the point.


7

Use the ogr2ogr utility with the ST_REVERSE function in a SQL statement and OGR SQLite dialect: For example: ogr2ogr -dialect SQLITE -sql "select st_reverse(GEOMETRY), * from input" output.shp input.shp Note: You need to pass in the st_reverse(GEOMETRY) first as the GEOMETRY field is automatically selected if the * wildcard is used and ogr will write only ...


7

In this instance you should import: Raster 1: im.jp2 Raster 2: DSM.tif Vector ShapeFile: clip.shp


7

In order to have an island in a hole you need a multi-part polygon (exterior ring, interior ring, exterior ring). It is not required that interior rings follow the exterior ring for which they are an exclusion, as per page 9 of the specification: The order of rings in the points array is not significant. but the most common implementations do track that, ...


7

Firstly, add r literal to path string like r"C:\Users\....., secondly, use shapeType instead of ShapeType.


7

OSM data is split into segments ("ways", in OSM parlance) whenever any property changes (name, surface, width, legality of herding yaks, ...). You have to decide what you mean by "the same road", assemble the bits that join up geometrically, and cut up the result according to your definition of "the same road". This might be ...


6

This functionality is now integrated in QGIS 3.10 (not sure about previous versions): Open the attribute table of the vector layer in question. Click on the Switch to form view icon on the bottom right of the attribute table. On the bottom left, just below the list of features, choose to either Automatically pan to the current feature or Automatically zoom ...


6

Step 1. Defining unknown CRS I would suggest double-checking if suddenly there is a prj-file, placed in the shapefile location. If not, you can try using projfinder. For instance, when one tried it with provided coordinates (3465878, 5482952) There are two options: EPSG:31467 Name:DHDN / 3-degree Gauss-Kruger zone 3, as was mentioned by @MrXsquared EPSG:...


6

When you try to add data on QGIS you could choose between different data type (File, Directory, Database and Protocol:HTTP(S),cloud,ect?) The error you get state that the chosen "Protocol" source type has failed to load the data and suggest that you try the File source type. As shapefile are of the file type you must choose File to be able to load it.


6

Try this expression on your Sectors layer's attribute table: aggregate(layer := 'Houses', aggregate:= 'mean', expression:= "area", filter:= within(centroid($geometry), geometry(@parent))) A quick test output ("ave" field) below:


6

loc primarily "label of the index" based. So, for the first iteration gdf1['NAME_2'][0] returns muni1. Then you get error using gdf1.loc['muni1'], because Pandas interprets 'muni1'('Abad') as index label, but it's value of NAME_2 You should change munis = gdf1.loc[gdf1['NAME_2'][i]] into gdf1.loc[gdf1['NAME_2'] == gdf1['NAME_2'][i]] in for loop.


6

A shapefile is capable of representing features on the ground to within a centimetre of precision. Disagreements between two spatial data sets that claim to represent the same entity may occur for several reasons. Representing a curved border with centimetre precision requires a lot of points along the border. This makes your data set very very large. In ...


6

Run the command with -d switch https://postgis.net/docs/using_postgis_dbmanagement.html#shp2pgsql_usage -d Drops the database table before creating a new table with the data in the Shape file. for overwriting the table that you have created with your previous trials. The first error message tries to help ERROR: relation "geo_br" already exists.


6

You have created a new (empty) layer instead of opening an existing layer. As a file with the same name as the new empty layer already existed, you would have seen a message "The layer already exists, Are you sure you want to overwrite the existing file?". Since you clicked "yes"/"ok", you have saved your newly created empty ...


6

Unfortunately, your shapefile is corrupted based on the information I gathered in the comments--primarily, that you cannot open the file in QGIS. Here are the troubleshooting steps that I use to address an error such as yours: Double check the file path Try to open a different file in the same command See if the shapefile is corrupted by opening it in QGIS/...


5

Use Clip Raster by Mask tool from the Toolbox and click on the green iterator to clip the raster image by each smaller boundary inside the shapefile: Input Raster: Using the above tool with iterator enabled, here is the result:


5

A shapefile consists of several files, of which .shp, .shx and .dbf are mandatory. These should be located in the same folder or in a zipped container. Open the shapefile by just dropping the .shp file or zipped container in the map frame, or use Ctrl+Shift+V.


5

Actually, you've got the .shx component purpose wrong (though it's a common misconception). The .shp component contains a header and the coordinate data. The .shx contains the same header and a simple array of {record number, starting position} records, for direct access by record number to the actual geometry records in the .shp. The .dbf is an 80's ...


5

Yes, you can physically move the polygons of the outer territories in geographic data, but this would degrade data unnecessarily. The much better solution hinted at by @ThingumaBob is to simply use multiple map frames when designing your export. Create a map frame for each outlying territory, then move those around on your sheet layout for printing/viewing ...


5

First off, a 100 byte shapefile indicates, that this file is just empty. The header of a shapefile is 100 byte. See https://www.esri.com/library/whitepapers/pdfs/shapefile.pdf on page 3. Secondly, the message "When you run QGIS and open a project file (.qgs), a new version of QGIS will read the .shp files and update them for format changes that go with the ...


5

With shapely box and GeoPandas import rasterio as rio ra = rio.open("raster.tif") bounds = ra.bounds Convert bounds to shapely geometry from shapely.geometry import box geom = box(*bounds) print(geom.wkt) POLYGON ((205625.4144070312 88411.04799999669, 205625.4144070312 90534.35044407193, 202086.5770002506 90534.35044407193, 202086.5770002506 88411....


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