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1

in the raster calculator, the symbol "^" is a boolean operator, not the power function. For the square values, you should either use the Power() function or the equivalent operator ** "prec_1" ** 2 Power("prec_1",2) In addition, make sure that you work in float, before your percentages could be rounded to zero before you multiply by 100. Another ...


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Yes. Raster objects have a maximum property. Just make sure statistics have been calculated for the raster or maximum will return None. E.g. Con("my_raster.tif" > "other_raster.tif".maximum, value_if_true, value_if_false)


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You could use the MAXIMUM argument in arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management() to get the highest cell value in the raster. See the documentation for Get Raster Properties (Data Management). eg, x = arcpy.GetRasterProperties_management("udlen", "MAXIMUM") Is that what you're after?


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At Arc Desktop 10.7.1, this works for me (note that it requires the Spatial Analyst extension): Open the Raster Calculator and enter the following in the Map Algebra Expression pane: Con("your_raster" == "your_raster".maximum, "your_raster") [Note: this selects the cell with the maximum value from your_raster.] Enter the name of the output raster that ...


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Not the most efficient, but the easiest way is to first, run the expand tool on your agricultural cells second, run the raster calculator to find pixels of the original raster that overlap agricultural pixels in the expanded raster. In commands, that would give something like this (assuming that your integer values for agri = a1 or a2 and forest = f1 ...


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If you want to set pixels to null when "MyRaster" >= 2800 and set everything else to the values of "MyRaster" all in one step, use this expression: Con("MyRaster" < 2800, "MyRaster") or this expression: SetNull("MyRaster" >= 2800, "MyRaster")


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You can use GRASS processing algorithms from withing QGIS. v.rast.stats should do what you require. You could also probably use QGIS' native Zonal histogram but then you'd have to process the output yourself to find the quartiles from the unique value counts. If you have only one polygon, or want it done over all of the raster which is covered by the ...


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My understanding is that if the independent variables account for all the spatial autocorrelation in y, then there is no need to account for spatial autocorrelation in the models. To test this, we need to use spatial indicators like Moran's I, Geary's C. Alternatively, you can test the presence of spatial autocorrelation, after building the model. The ...


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This does not sound like a use case for the ArcGIS Spatial Analyst or a TIN data format. If you know the area of a particular polygon, and that is easy to calculate for a shapefile, or is automatically calculated for a geodatabase feature class, then all you need do to get the volume that you are after is to multiply that area by the height you want to ...


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