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3

I am not clear exactly what you are wanting to test here. Do you have a hypothesis? You can certainly take a sampling approach in evaluating the "accuracy" of the lower resolution binominal classification along with hypothesis testing the distributional equivalence of the binominal classes. Here is a worked example, in R, of what testing a ...


4

Alternatively, you could just calculate it yourself in the raster calculator. The modified version of the SAVI (MSAVI) does not require an L factor and is a bit more stable across a range of settings. It is derived using the red and nir bands thus: (2 * NIR + 1 - sqrt( (2 * NIR + 1)^2 - 8 * (NIR - RED) )) / 2 References Qi J., Chehbouni A., Huete A.R., Kerr ...


2

Elevation is major factor in air temperature pattern, for small study area it is better to a) derive regression equation Temperature(Elevation) which in theory should show 6 degrees drop per 1 km of elevation, b)apply it on elevation model and c) forget other two factors, i.e. latitude and longitude or interpolate residuals i.e. deviations from Temperature(...


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There are many reasons you can get this error, but here are some of the most common: Rasters do not have same extent or scale Rasters not in same geodatabase Rasters do not share same projection Output filename too long "Spatial Analyst" extension has not been enabled


3

When creating raster data in geodatabase, you do not need to add file extension such as .tif. This a mentioned in the help of Create Raster Dataset: When storing a raster dataset in a geodatabase, do not add a file extension to the name of the raster dataset.


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You can use Combine tool to combine the two rasters of temperature and elevation. The combine tool: Combines multiple rasters so that a unique output value is assigned to each unique combination of input values. Although in your case, maybe, you don't want to create a new raster with unique values for the combined rasters, but at least you can see both ...


2

The <5% that you want could also be written as "less than five percent rise", so you want to output "percent rise". In general degrees or percent rise are just two different ways to measure the same slope. The ArcGIS "How Slope Works" page explains the math of how you convert from one to the other with some basic trigonometry,...


0

I wasn't able to find a solution on the RemapValue help page for calling the RemapValue tables that I 'copied and pasted' into the Python environment (look like this SiteA_remap = arcpy.sa.RemapValue([[1,100], [2,200]]). I had tried to build the RemapValue table name within the Python script (e.g., my_Remap = os.path.basename(inPath) + "_remap"), ...


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The code should be like this import arcpy, os #Define the workspace that contains all of the folders with the Sentinel Imagery arcpy.env.workspace = "L:\\Arcpy\\Data\\Satellite_image" #Specify where you would like the output to go output = "L:\\Arcpy\\Data\\Layer_stack" # List of all workspace perviously defind the workspace. folders = ...


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Short Answer: ESRI's Spatial Analysis Map Algebra contains a fixed set of operators which can manipulate rasters. Your desired EXPINT() function is not among them. Longer Answer: Since you want to calculate this value for every cell in a new raster based on constants and the value of a corresponding cell in an existing raster, a new feature called the Raster ...


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OK, actually I just fixed it now. To answer my question, I need to provide a bit of additional background: Basically, the aspect interval isn't hard coded, it's supplied through a parameter. However, it was accessed through the .ValueAsText method, which returns the value as a string. However, afterwards it is treated as an integer, which is where the errors ...


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