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You can do that from display property. Select the Output Direction Raster -> right-click -> Display properties: Delete the text beside the name and change the Border Width to empty: Select the Arrow and do the same thing by changing the color of the arrow and arrow head to white color: Deselect the arrow. Here is the final result:


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SOLUTION: I used TauDEM to correct the stream network using the DEM. Below are my results. It is still not exact but it is a huge improvement and definitely usable for my work. Here is a link to a useful guide for anyone using TauDEM for their first time: http://hydrology.usu.edu/taudem/taudem5/TauDEM51GettingStartedGuide.pdf


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If you have access to an Advanced license or ArcGIS Pro the 'Identity tool' is what you are looking for if I understand the question correctly. You would just need to merge on a distinguishable attribute to get a total sum of overlaying polygons.


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Yes, you can usually see NoData cells without Spatial Analyst, directly from the raster. On the Symbology tab, look for the Display NoData As drop down button. This is usually set to no fill/no color. You can change this to a strong color (and perhaps change other symbology for the raster to grays). The no data cells should be easy to spot. Of course, if ...


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You can use SetNull to get rid of all the cells below 115 and then reclassify the output raster into three classes as you explained in your question. In Field calculator or SetNull Tool in ArcToolBox you can write the following: SetNull("YourRaster", "YourRaster", "VALUE < 115") Then reclassify the output raster from SetNull into the other three ...


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Running a regression on data that is spatially autocorrelated is fine, and unavoidable in most scenarios (e.g. ecological modelling). It is when you have SAC in your residuals that you have issues. The assumptions of independence are not met and the chance of Type 1 error is increased. Not to mention potential for unstable/biased parameter estimates. So it'...


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Picture below shows talweg, generated by using flood depth and flow paths derived by using Hydrology tools: As one can see flow paths depict channel shape in a well defined valleys without depressions along it. If there is one, results are random. What is happening on a flat terrain is absolutely out of control, your pictures illustrate this nicely. So in ...


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If anyone is ever wondering the same thing, I deleted them and there were no issues.


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Before you address the second part of the question, which will likely be solved using raster algebra or a similar function, you will need to clarify in statistical terms what you mean by "probability of occurrence". The "Kernel Density" tool gives you a raster where the cell values represent the "number of seals per unit area". In other words, how many ...


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In ArcMap or ArcGIS Pro, you have built-in on the fly map projection lets you line up all your data in the same projection as the dataframe. Not all Arcpy tools work in the same way, and you may have data in two different coordinate systems. I think rasters are usually suscpetible to this. You can use the Project raster tool to create a new raster in the ...


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This should do the trick: Con("raster1" == 0,0, ("raster1" + "raster2"))


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User2856's answer correctly addressed the core issue. The other issue that was causing the error to persist was subtle differences in the Cell Statistics function. Apparently running ArcPy within ArcMap requires different syntax than standalone Python. The way it finally worked was: outraster = CellStatistics(myrasters, "SUM", "DATA") and not: outraster = ...


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Yes, this is possible with ModelBuilder. There is a tool called "Zonal Statistics as Table" -http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/tools/spatial-analyst-toolbox/h-how-zonal-statistics-works.htm. You're on the right track. Georg's answer about using inline variable substitution can help with naming the output files.


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You are passing a nested list - a "list of lists". myrasters is already a list (['raster1.tif', 'raster2.tif', etc...]) then you wrap it in another list. CellStatistics expects a list of rasters, so when it accessed the 1st element of your list and that element was a list not a raster, it raised an exception. Change: outraster = arcpy.gp....


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Measuring the elevation along a transect is a bit like measuring the length of a coastline. If you change the resolution, you change the final result, but none of the result is relevant if you don't mention the scale of the measurement. If you look at a portion of soil with a binocular, every grain of sand will be a cliff. If you fly high on a plane, only ...


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