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The OSGeo is a repository for the open source GIS community. There are a few applications highlighted here that may suite your needs. QGIS - QGIS can handle a variety of vector and raster GIS data sets. The application interface is intuitive, and has a similar look and feel like ESRI ArcMap. The application may also be installed on a variety of OS ...


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Generally you can make a new geospatial table like this: SELECT * INTO europe.borders FROM wo_borders WHERE admin_lvl2 = 'eu'; -- Define a primary key ALTER TABLE europe.borders ADD PRIMARY KEY (gid); -- Spatially enable it SELECT Populate_Geometry_Columns('europe.borders'::regclass); However, by doing this you are segregating your database (un-...


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Several options! Within QGIS, you can "File|Save as" the shapefile directly as a spatialite database; the limitation here is that you can make a database with only one shapefile. You can use the command line spatialite_tool to load and manage shapefiles (tutorial here). It is really worth exploring the spatialite-gui and spatialite-gis standalone ...


18

If you have Ubuntu 12.04, then you should have PostgreSQL 9.1, which makes things awesome for PostGIS 2.0, where you can use use the new EXTENSION framework. To spatially enable a database, use the DDL from a SQL window: CREATE EXTENSION postgis; See other details for installing PostGIS 2.0 from source for Ubuntu 12.04 here. If you are using PostGIS 1.5, ...


16

The most efficient index for the query expressed in your question is the one on gid as it is the only column that appears in a where expression: CREATE INDEX table_gid ON table (gid); You can safely drop the gist index as it will only consume space and slow inserts/updates/deletes down. Long explanation As I said the most effective index in your case is ...


16

Use the -nlt option. In this case you want: -nlt MULTILINESTRING There is also PROMOTE_TO_MULTI (GDAL 1.10 and later), which chooses either MULTILINESTRING or MULTIPOLYGON depending on the input layer. The use case for this is "doing a mass conversion of shapefiles that [mix] different types of geometries".


15

you can use the export (multiple). In ArcCatalog... Just right click on the database and choose "export to shapefile (multiple)" If you do it at the database level you will see everything in the database in the tool listed (there is a remove button if there are a few you don't want). If you do it at the feature dataset level you see everything in ...


15

Aside from Spatialite, you might also want to consider PostGIS. Think of it as Spatialite's big brother ;-) It's just another data source for QGIS while you can connect to it using the RODBC package in R.


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First off, the ASTER GDEM is not a "datum," it's just a digital elevation model or DEM. The values in the ASTER GDEM are represented in the EGM96 vertical datum. Second, the ASTER GDEM is a "first return" DEM that does contain above-ground structures like buildings and trees. This is cited in the GDEM report Validation of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation ...


14

I started an open source GDAL/OGR ArcGIS plugin project this weekend that gives read support to spatialite and any other OGR vector data source like Google Fusion Tables. I have it working locally reading spatialite and will cleanup and push the rest of changes this coming Friday. I hope you find it useful. Update 1: OK, got it working today. The ...


14

While your database is technically spatial at this point, you would only be working with the inbuilt pg geometry types. In order to complete your installation, you do need to run the scripts as suggested. You can find them in your /usr/share/postgresql/[version number]/contrib/ postgis sub-directory. You should see the following: legacy_minimal.sql ...


14

While the PostGIS in Action book isn't a step by step tutorial, it is a very handy guide, and I recommend it to anyone who wants to truly understand PostGIS and get beyond just the basics of PostGIS.


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You can use a native PostGIS database as an SDE data store. http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/main/10.1/index.html#//002p0000006v000000 That link describes the basic setup to register a native PostGIS table with SDE. The drawback is that ESRI only supports a narrow range of Postgres and PostGIS versions, here's the list of what they support: http://...


13

The real advantage to spatial databases (PostGIS, spatial extensions to MySQL or anything else) is that you can do spatial operations on spatial data. If you are just storing point coordinates, then you don't really gain much from spatial (just use two numerical columns). If you store combinations of point coordinates (where the customers are), and line ...


13

As unicoletti said, the gist index in the geometry column would only work if you use ST_Contains() in the WHERE expression. For instance, if you would like to know all polygons that contain one another, you could use something like this: SELECT a.gid, b.gid FROM table AS a, table as b WHERE a.gid != b.gid and ST_Contains(a.way, b.way) In this case, ...


13

For displaying purposes it is always good to use a spatial index. It will improve speed of both rendering and spatial queries. However, if you plan to update large quantities of objects, it might be wise to remove the spatial index during the update. Otherwise the update process will become significantly slower, because with every update the spatial index ...


13

The arcpy.da.Walk() method is the way to go: import arcpy, os workspace = r"C:\Users\OWNER\Documents\ArcGIS\Default.gdb" feature_classes = [] for dirpath, dirnames, filenames in arcpy.da.Walk(workspace, datatype="FeatureClass", type="Any"): for filename ...


12

It is possible to store celestial positions in PostGIS - you just need to create your own coordinate system! PostGIS gets all its coordinate system and projection information from the table spatial_ref_sys which is normally populated when the database is initialized. But there is nothing stopping you adding your own projections - indeed it is practically ...


12

QGIS supports PostGIS - including a dedicated PostGIS Manager plugin for seamless work Spatialite - there is also Spatialite Manager MSSQL 2008 Spatial - also supported by default starting from version 1.8 Oracle Spatial - via OGR but not by default & Oracle Spatial GeoRaster plugin ESRI File/(Personal) Geodatabase - via OGR All database connections ...


12

Based on your requirements, you may need a GIS stack: server, database, presentation, and then the analysis tools. I'd recommend GeoServer (http://www.geoserver.org) for server, PostgreSQL with PostGIS extension for database (http://postgis.net). This combination can enable easy distributed authoring/analysis and publishing using WFS, WPS, and WMS, which ...


12

you could try http://www.bostongis.com/ they have a number of guides for PostGIS also the links provided by the other posters are also excellent tutorials. For general GIS information, ESRI's website has some excellant tutorials www.esri.com. and also provide training video's in relation to their software. Other links to try http://geospatial.ucdenver.edu/...


12

You can achieve this by preparing all those layers in one (or more) project files. Share these projects on the network and you can load them using Layer - Embed Layers and Groups. If you want to change anything in these layers, open the original project file and changes will appear in all projects that contain embedded layers.


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$sql = "SELECT points.name FROM polygons, points WHERE ST_CONTAINS(polygons.geom, Point(points.longitude, points.latitude)) AND polygons.name = 'California'";


12

It is definitely possible to pull all the layers into one database, although in a multiuser environment, this will be best if most users will only be reading (not editing) the data. The easiest way to quickly convert a large number of shapefiles to a single SpatiaLite database is to use ogr2ogr. Make sure your shapefiles are in a single folder (e.g. ...


11

Yes it can be done with QGis. Using the QSpatiaLite Plugin "Manage your SpatiaLite databases within QGis" After installing the plugin you can run it. You will receive a series of messages/errors stating that you do not have a spatialite db. it will step you through getting one installed (choose a location for the file) and finally converting it to ...


11

I am working at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay Ontario. I have created the same type of facility in my university last year, with the same needs. I have chosen to use QGIS with a PostGIS database. We do have educational licenses of ArcGIS and PCI for teaching purposes, but I am trying to stay away from all of that. If you have any other questions, or ...


11

I think the fastest way to go at this if you want to host it in your computer would be to use the OpenGeo Suite. It has a web client, a map application server and a spatial database. You can load the shape files into the database by using its shape file to PostGIS loader. You can then view the layers through the GeoExplorer web app that's bundled with the ...


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Perhaps the Intro to PostGIS would fit the bill, http://postgis.net/workshops/postgis-intro/


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Geohash are very simple and effective way of indexing spatial features, particularly point features. Line and polygon features are little harder to index, but can be done. Geohash is a static hierarchical fixed size grid, overlayed on top of the earth surface. Grid cells of the same hierarchical level do not overlap. R-Tree is a dynamic grid which cell ...


11

How about a local PostGIS instance? PostgeSQL can be downloaded from https://www.postgresql.org/download/ to which a PostGIS extension can be created to make it a spatial database. Also recommended would be to download pgAdmin https://www.pgadmin.org/ See How do I setup a PostGIS database and open it in QGIS on Windows? which may help with the set up.


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