10

If you have the XY of the point, then you could create a PointGeometry. current_sr = arcpy.SpatialReference(102726) #Enter the current WKID for the point new_sr = arcpy.SpatialReference(4326) #This is the WKID for WGS84 point = arcpy.PointGeometry(arcpy.Point(7334719, 670307), current_sr) new_point = point.projectAs(new_sr) >>> new_point....


8

It's a good question, so let's be rigorous with a solution. Regardless of the algorithm involved, the flow direction is ultimately determined by fitting planes to the surface at each point. (Theoretically, these planes are the derivative of the surface; in practice they are often computed as least-squares fits to the values in the immediate 3X3 ...


6

The northern two-thirds of Georgia should be pretty good, because the South Carolina coordinate reference system is Lambert conformal conic-based. Thus, the standard parallels extend through Georgia too. I ran a point at 31N 85W through the National Geodetic Survey's SPC program to see what the distortion would be. Note: South Carolina's zone is 3900. It ...


6

Grid convergence is the angle between true north and the grid north. It varies from point to point except in cylindrical projections, for which all meridians are parallel. For conic projections the meridians all radiate from a central point (off the map to the north in the Northern hemisphere), making it clear the convergence changes as you move in an east-...


6

Look for EPSG:3968, NAD83 / Virginia Lambert. There are variants using different geographic coordinate reference systems (CRS) like 3969 on NAD83 HARN, 3970 on NAD83 NSRS2007, and 6591 on NAD83 (2011). The definition came from the Virginia Information Technologies Agency. Because it uses the Lambert conformal conic projection, that means that shapes/angles ...


5

You have an ESRI projection (ESRI:102719) however PostGIS (and everyone else but ESRI) are expecting EPSG:2264 (or possibly EPSG:3359 or EPSG:3632). You can use the ESRI one (just be aware that this will not interoperate well with others) - just run the following: INSERT into spatial_ref_sys (srid, auth_name, auth_srid, proj4text, srtext) values ( 9102719, ...


4

there are several categories in the utm section of esri crs projected. go to the projected coordinate systems. then to UTM, Then look at the nad83 BLM (US Feet). That should work in both autodesk and esri. (EPSG) 32165


4

Almost all software for doing coordinate projection use geographic coordinates as a standard system in the middle and defines "forward" (from geographic to projected) and "inverse" (from projected to geographic) routines for projections. So, to go from a UTM projection (say "UTM 10 N") to a stateplane projection (say "Washington Stateplane North") you'd ...


4

I just tested with MNMapPLUTO.shp from http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/planning/download/zip/data-maps/open-data/qn_mappluto_16v1.zip in QGIS 2.16 and 2.17 and I cannot reproduce your issue. Open Shapefile in empty project Save as ... new CRS Resulting file/layer is in WGS84 If I'd have to guess: Don't change the CRS in the original layer's properties to WGS84....


4

... or do I have to split the data up into North and South? For this part of the question, the state plane coordinate system divides a (larger) state into multiple zones in order to limit the map distortion in each zone to a certain level. Whether you have to split the data into zones or use a CRS that covers the entire state depends on your tolerance for ...


3

Without knowing the projection, or datum of the monuments, the only way to transform them correctly would be through a great deal of trial, and error. Given the latitude of the area you are in, the Northing is too small to be in UTM meters, or feet, unless the first digit of the coordinate has been removed for space saving. Knowing where the monuments are ...


3

Calculating area, length, and other geometric properties in the Online Help has the instructions. Bring the data into ArcMap. Set the projection to State Plane. Open the Attribute Table. right click on the state plane x field (or add it) Select calculate geometry Select the X coridinate and the state plane projection and it will calculate the x in state ...


3

If I am reading your question correctly, you may find Formula For State Plane to Lat/Lon Conversion at GeoNet useful. Posters here outlined resources for the math behind State Plane to Geographic Coordinates. I'd pay particular attention to a manual from EPSG entitled "Geomatics Guidance Note 7, part 2 Coordinate Conversions & Transformations including ...


2

Have you tried making a custom projection? Here is a walkthrough from esri knowledgebase.


2

You shouldn't need to specify transformForward. Just set the inSR to 4269 (from Geographic Coordinate Systems, for GCS_North_American_1983), and the outSR parameter to 3418.


2

From mkennedy, the answer: "it's NAD 27 state plane zone, so already in US survey feet . . . I used US NGS programs to look up the state plane zone, then to test converting the xy points to lat/lon."


2

jbalk's answer is the means to intentionally convert from your GCS to State Plane. The direct answer to your question is that unless you intentionally changed/transformed the projection into State Plane the data is probably still in GCS but stored 'thinking' it is in State Plane. At that point, a feature at lat long 30,90 will be showing close to 0,0 in ...


2

In the export/Save data dialogue of QGIS you can set the output coordinate system. Right-click on the layer, select "save as" and in the dialogue set the CRS via the "choose crs" button on the right hand side of the dropdown. There you can choose WGS84, probably you'll need EPSG:4326 (hint: type 4326 in the filter box).


2

You might look into http://desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/latest/map/projections/choosing-an-appropriate-transformation.htm Conversions between NAD83 and WGS84 are always done on lat-long coordinates. So you have to convert your Illinois coordinates from transverse mercator to NAD83 lat-long with the parameters you have got, then use the transformation from ...


2

It works for me this way: Put the coordinates in a file named spcs-in.txt: 6929072.797 2040185.208 Put the commandline in a batchfile spcs2nad83.bat: echo nad83:402 >out.txt cs2cs +init=nad83:402 +units=us-ft +to +init=epsg:4269 -f "%%.9f" spcs-in.txt >>out.txt echo epsg:2226>>out.txt cs2cs +init=epsg:2226 +to +init=epsg:4269 -f "%%.9f" ...


2

It turns out the fix was trivial; I needed to pass in "preserve_units=True" into the Proj object creation: EPSG_FROM = pyproj.Proj(init="EPSG:2278", preserve_units=True) EPSG_TO = pyproj.Proj(init="EPSG:4326") # ... Still not entirely clear to me why I couldn't get https://mygeodata.cloud/cs2cs/ to work as expected. This answer led me down the path: ...


2

You can define one coordinates system for the project, and the CRS of layers located in this project will be converted to the project coordinates system but make sure 'on-the-fly re-projection' feature is active. Steps to set project CRS: Settings->Project Properties (or click on the globe symbol in the lower right corner). Select the Coordinate ...


2

There is no single, national State Plane coordinate system; there is a different one for each state. What kind of geostatistics are you calculating? If you are doing area-based calculations you'd be best off using an Equal Area projection. Note that State Plane systems use Conformal projections, not equal area.


1

GeoTools handles reprojection of SRS for you. You can use code like: boolean lenient = false; CoordinateReferenceSystem crs = DefaultGeographicCRS.WGS84; CoordinateReferenceSystem target = CRS.decode("EPSG:3649"); MathTransform transform = CRS.findMathTransform(crs, target, lenient ); ReferencedEnvelope res = new ReferencedEnvelope(JTS.transform(bbox, ...


1

If you set the "Output spatial reference" field to "4326", you'll get the results returned using EPSG:4326 coordinate system, which is the usual lat-long used these days, and is the same system that most GPS units default to. With "output spatial reference" left blank: # results: 1 OwnerName: US GOVERNMENT geometry Polygon: Ring0:[981499.81518554687,...


1

If you are trying to reproject the data from X to Y (in your case from WGS84 to a state plane system) the easiest most error proof way is to open a fresh map load the WGS84 file (x file) in Arcmap will automatically configure itself to project data in the map based on the first import. Then use the project tool and reproject to go to your desired projection....


1

I ended up going back out into the field to record the lat & long of where the GPS believed the points were located, and it was off by 218 m. Not sure exactly how the GPS unit came to put them there, but now I know where the points ended up, so good enough.


1

ArcGIS answer Copy the original shapefile. Use the Project Tool to convert to the state plane zone. Load it into the database. Open ArcMap and add the two layers from the ArcSDE database. They should line up because ArcMap will have set the data frame's coordinate system to one of the layers, and the other layer will be projected on-the-fly to the ...


1

There are algorithms that will transform from a grid system to another grid system without going without requiring a conversion to lat-long. So the best answer I can come up with is not always, but often they use lat-long.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible