Hot answers tagged

9

There are many ways to deal with this, but a few stand out as being general and effective. To understand this, let's enumerate a few of the problems that might have to be dealt with: There could be gaps between poles that are so great, the algorithm might view the gaps as being actual breaks in the transmission system. There may be some short segments of ...


7

I worked as a GIS analyst in the celluar telecommunications industry for a short while. Most of my tasks centered around working with coverage data, i.e. making coverage maps. I also did a lot of analysis with Census data, determining how many people we covered, what services they were covered with, and how many people lived in areas with "good" coverage. A ...


7

Basically following whuber's approach, I would try this: Split the road at the (yellow) starting point. Add three fields to the roads: FROMDIST, TODIST and PARENTROAD_ID. FROMDIST will store the distance from the starting point for the from node of the polyline, likewise for TODIST. PARENTROAD_ID will store the ROAD_ID of the road that is closer to the ...


6

It sounds like you're asking "what GIS subject matter theory should I learn?" and "how can I go about applying it?" The needs of a Telecom will appeal to various niche-applications of GIS. So you should approach learning the concepts and jargon of the relevant niches (i.e. gaining Subject Matter Expertise), then once you get the concepts (many of which you ...


4

I have encountered this while working on broadband communications and mobile telephony for the FCC (in the US). For an introduction to this viewpoint, see Wagen & Risk, Radiowave propagation, building databases, and GIS: anything in common? A radio engineer's viewpoint. The stuff I have seen ranges from calculations that are so simple they're stupid (...


4

There are lots of different areas of Telco. I'd suggest looking into Fiber-to-the-Home (FTTH). If you're in the US, stimulus funding for deploying fiber to rural areas makes this an attractive area. (This sure looks better than LightSquared plan which interferes with GPS reception.) The relational database designs for modeling fiber connectivity I've ...


3

It sounds to me like you really are looking for a Geometric Network in a geodatabase. What if you created a geometric network where your roads would serve as your "trunk lines" and then simply add "feeder lines" that run perpendicular from your roads to your points. Then you should be able to "set and view flow direction, change analysis settings, add ...


3

Kitex You could do a SQL Select that would calculate the areas. MapInfo Professional also has a built-in ProportionOverlap() function that could be used to calculate the proportion/percentage. Select BORDER.ID, CartesianArea(Overlap(BORDER.OBJ, COVERAGE.OBJ), "sq m") "Overlap" , ProportionOverlap(BORDER.OBJ, COVERAGE.OBJ) "PropOverlap" From BORDER, ...


3

Check out http://www.opencellid.org/ this is an open source project offering open data. There might be some working involved in turn the data into "GIS" data but could be a good place to start. You can download the "raw" data at http://dump.opencellid.org/ - you're probably looking for the "cells" data, which is given as CSV (easily imported into any GIS ...


3

I once worked in Telecom project and learned a lot out of it. The best GIS work i have seen in Telecome sector is Telcordia. Have a look on their brochure which explain little bit what they can do in Telcome. http://www.telcordia.com/collateral/brochures/net_engineer.pdf


3

From NOAA I think frequency and the condition of the ionosphere will be factors. Signals can bounce off the ionosphere, reducing the impact of terrain. Several years back I looked into interfacing VOACAP with GIS. I see now there is an online version. In higher latitudes, as I recall, the ionosphere is not very predictable. Update: Also, the Review of ...


3

Maybe you want to the also "The Radio Planning Tool for GRASS GIS" - Raplat. Citation: "It is especially designed for radio coverage calculation of GSM/UMTS systems, but can be applied also to other wireless systems in the frequency range 400 MHz – 2.4 GHz (e.g. TETRA, WiFi). Its structure is modular and characterized by high level of flexibility and ...


2

This answer is a little bit off-base but it might help someone.... I tried to tackle this problem a few weeks ago (trying to get cell coverage data), but the questions I kept asking is why? I found a quicker solution by using the interactive maps that are already provided by cell providers. http://www.thadwester.com/1/post/2011/11/custom-cell-coverage-...


2

The use of GIS in telecom is most of all about documentation. What is the infrastructure (cables, ducts, customers, ...) of the network operator? Which cables are spliced on to each other? ... Next to documentation, planning new networks (typically fibre based, or FTTx) with GIS enables great features. (Disclaimer: I work for a company that has a product ...


2

The Telecom circles, or rather Telecom Service Areas (as they are now known) in India are roughly based on the Administrative districts. You can get the list of Services Areas from here: http://www.dot.gov.in/uas/Amendment%20dated%204%20Jul%2007%20to%20CMTS%20&%20%20UASL.pdf Based on this you could dissolve the district boundaries to get rough service ...


2

It's 2019! https://www.ic.gc.ca/app/sitt/bbmap/hm.html?lang=eng Looks like you can search by address, and if you click on the area information tab, you can get which providers are available. This wasn’t available in 2017. If you download the map data, you don’t get provider information. Then, looking at the FAQ for that page, I found this: https://open....


1

I figured out this was an issue with the browser and "Allow-control-allow-origin" extension from chrome was a fix. https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/allow-control-allow-origi/nlfbmbojpeacfghkpbjhddihlkkiljbi?hl=en


1

You can try to create one using a GIS application like QGIS. You can search the web for data source on broadband coverage data. There are several free shapefiles of the various regions of Canada which you can add the broadband data to. Came across this link http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/publications/reports/policymonitoring/2013/cmr6.htm


1

As stated in another answer, this is a type of Steiner Tree problem. The problem is NP-Complete (basically meaning you can't solve the best possible solution in any reasonable amount of time). You would need to approximate the solution - there is no tool within the ESRI platform to do this for you directly. The closest "out of the box" tool I've found ...


1

Speaking for Germany, I suppose you are looking for locations of "Hauptverteiler (HVT)", Englisch "Main Distribution Frame (MDF)". Finding these locations and even more their area of distribution is non-trivial. There was a list on the "Zukunft Breitband" initiative. Most information and a download link can be found on this OpenStreetMap page (German). It ...


1

OpenStreetMap only contains data that was collected by individuals, or supplied by the authorities as public data. Boundaries and US Area Codes belong to the second part. I rather doubt if Indian telecom would give away their data for free in the same manner.


1

Disclaimer: I don't know much about telecom, but I've just been through a geography/GIS program oriented on ArcGIS, and am in the process of rounding out my skillset. On the cartography side of things it becomes very important to have a large volume of small assignments and brutally honest human critique to improve your skills, in addition to a basic ...


1

@Thad, I believe the solution is to write a method to leverage the .Net Process API, which can call command line utilities, submit arguments, and even collect feedback. If you don't want to use .Net, many other techologies allow you to work with Standard In/Out. In Adobe AIR this is accomplished with the NativeProcess API, and in PHP it's handled using the ...


1

Unfortunately, I have no experience to provide with the first part of your question. That sounds like a conversation that you would have to have with a cell provider or phone company to see if they would be willing to give you a download of their datafiles. Or, you can look for other sources who might have similar information, think federal agencies. It ...


1

As a starter (not the complete solution). We probably need to know data format, version and license level of your arcgis. What I see is to utilize the road network as a linear referencing system, and then "re-number" the poles in the correct sequence. Then you should be able to use one of several tools (I'm sure someone else's answer will define that more ...


1

Yes, there is some free software. We are strongly using QGIS open platform in Telecomunication. We published free FTTx / FTTH planning and design software. You can download it at FTTx planning software Answering first two questions, nowadays there is no network inventory without GIS. We are proposing use of network inventory software as a center system from ...


1

You might want to take a look at TeleCAD-GIS, an Autodesk-based (commercial) software platform for planning, design, analysing, documenting and maintaining telecommunications infrastructure. It provides both geographical and schematic approach to telco networks designs, including: base maps, conduits, copper, fiber, coaxial and wireless networks, EMI and ...


1

I have been working on using RM to map out the current range of >30 towers in my work area (about 64,000km2) so that in a disaster inhabitants of remote properties can have a clear understanding of what communication pathways are available to them in areas which they can access at that time. A major part of this process was converting the txt file created ...


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