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27

Leaflet's default projection is EPSG:3857, also known as "Google Mercator" or "Web Mercator" and sometimes designated with the number "900913". This projection is what most slippy tile based maps use, including the common tile sets from Google, Bing, OpenStreetMap, and others. You can easily use this projection in QGIS by selecting "Google Mercator EPSG:...


23

I propose two solutions: the first one using QGIS, the second one using Python (GDAL). Solution using QGIS In QGIS you may create a VRT mosaic. Please follow this procedure (see the image below): Load the raster in the Layers Panel; Right-click on it and choose Save As...; Check the Create VRT option; Choose the folder where your outputs will be saved; ...


17

I would recommend looking into TileMill which is made by the same people that were workign on Maps On A Stick. TileMill was either part of Maps On A Stick, or is what Maps On A Stick became - something like that. I forget the connection. Anyway... TileMill will let you load geographic data, style it how you like and then create a set of PNG map tiles for a ...


14

You can write a simple shell script and use gdal_translate utility to chop the tiles. On Mac, get the GDAL build from here. On Windows,the best way to get GDAL is via the OSGeo4W installer. In the following script, you need to replace following things XDIM and YDIM with your source jp2 X and Y dimensions gdal_translate with the actual path on your system ...


13

I added aerial imagery from GIS server and created fishnet over the area of interest: I use fishnet as index layer for my data driven pages, making sure the sorting order coincides with record order in fishnet table. I applied script (see below) to travel through pages, export them to temp raster, clip it to PNG raster named after page name. Result shows ...


13

No, they don't store every tile. There are several reasons for this: Size: Storing all tiles for all zoom levels would require more than 50 TB storage (source: Tile Disk Usage) Gain: Typically, only 1.79% of all tiles are actually viewed since many just contain water or other uninteresting regions (source: Tile Disk Usage) Computational costs: Pre-rendering ...


13

SRTM tiles (3601 px * 3601 px in this case) have 1-pixel overlaps in between. When you apply transparency (or reduced opacity) to your hillshade layer, such overlapping pixels stand out. You may have observed this also on the original images, if you apply transparency (see below). ..... original SRTM, Pseudo-color + 60% opacity Anyway, you can avoid ...


12

Before going down any more laborious paths, the simplest option is to reduce the geometry. What are your source datasets? How did you simplify them? How much did this reduce the geojson file size? If you are confident that you have done all you can on the above, then the lowest hanging fruit of your options is Serve the geojson file gzipped, ...


11

I recently came across a new plugin for QGIS 1.9 called QTiles. It's development was announced Dec 2012 on the QGIS Developer forum. QTiles designed to generate raster tiles from QGIS projects according to the Slippy Map specification [0] and supports two output types: directory and ZIP-archive. While I haven't personally used it, it looks very ...


11

This somewhat exists - here's a page of the various converters available. Exporting CartoCSS from other tools requires both mangling the native format and normalizing differences between how they treat data & the capabilities of the renderer.


11

Mapshaper.org is a handy free online tool that allows you to upload a geojson file, display it as a map, then choose one of three simplification alogrithims which you can adjust the strength of with a slider. It updates the map and highlights in red any places where there's a loss of integrity like an overlap between two regions. There's a 'fix' button that ...


10

Google has built their own vector map rendering engine based on OpenGL ES version 2: https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/android/start#requiring_opengl_es_version_2 Here's a link about OpenGL ES on Android: http://developer.android.com/training/graphics/opengl/index.html OpenGL lets you leverage the underlying power of the GPU and get ...


10

You can simply use Leaflet Provider extension to pickup the tile works the best for your project.


9

It is possible to generate tiles using python console, you can read about it here. Keep in mind, that you might need to modify the script. However I would encourage you to use mapnik for generating tiles, as above mentioned qgis script did not work well for me. Styling map is easy with xml for mapnik, you will not have any trouble with it. Some ...


9

you can use maptiler and upload the file structure in your SDcard. Then add a TMS layer and set the getURL parameter to a function that return an image from SDcard: var mapBounds = null; var mapMinZoom = 12; var mapMaxZoom = 16; var tmsoverlay = new OpenLayers.Layer.TMS( "TMS Overlay", "", { // url: '', serviceVersion: '.', layername: '.', type: '...


9

In other implementations (as in, our implementation) this is done with palette modification; you can quickly recolor a PNG image without touching the actual data, if you know the full original palette. Google doesn't do that; they likely have a tile-based database and tiles of vector data that are rasterized on the fly.


9

Definitely open to adding more features/functionality to my QGISTileMillExport plugin (as well as adding it to one of the plugin repos for easier installation once it's a bit more mature). I stubbed it out as a proof of concept for my own use a few months ago. As for workflow, I saw it as a way to bridge between data/rough styling in QGIS and final ...


9

WMS is a protocol defined by the OGC for requesting rendered map images for arbitrary areas. Clients can make requests to it in a tiled pattern if they wish. WMS-C is an extension for WMS created by OSGeo that adds metadata to the capabilities document letting the client know where to make requests so they line up with service's tiles. A WMS-C service may ...


8

Nokia owns Navteq (acquired in 2008 for $8.1bn) 4 Tile Servers with pre caching 1.maptile.lbs.ovi.com/maptiler/v2 2.maptile.lbs.ovi.com/maptiler/v2 3.maptile.lbs.ovi.com/maptiler/v2 4.maptile.lbs.ovi.com/maptiler/v2 They do generate their own tiles from this vector data into raster tiled png format (256px x 256px) files one example is http://1.maptile....


8

As pointed out by user30184, if you are using OpenCycleMap in an environment where the number of tiles you are requesting might be an issue, please check out the terms and conditions of the provider. The pricing schedule is publically available. Given the combination of no-self-hosting and the requirement for a non-free plan for a variation on the existing ...


7

Mike Migurski (of Stamen Design) recently made a major new open terrain map: details on his blog and I put up a quick map viewer for it. It does terrain relief shading with various DEM sources combined with roads, labels, etc from OpenStreetMap. The source code to generate the map is on GitHub.


7

I have written a tutorial on exactly this problem that you may find helpful. Basically it boils down to using gdal_translate, gdal_merge and gdal_retile so you will need to have installed GDAL. Either use apt-get install gdal or the osgeo4w installer


7

Just edit the renderd.conf and add a section for your second style (make sure the "URI" entry points to a different path than that of your default style). For example, my renderd.conf contains the sections [default] XML=/etc/mapnik-osm-carto-data/osm.xml URI=/osm/ DESCRIPTION=This is the standard osm mapnik style HOST=host.my CORS=* MINZOOM=0 MAXZOOM=20 [...


7

Try the new Tile Layer Plugin. The tile sources are stored in a tab delimitered text file. You can add sources as you want. For the Arcgis tiles, try: Arcgis Arcgis http://server.arcgisonline.com/ArcGIS/rest/services/World_Topo_Map/MapServer/tile/{z}/{y}/{x}.png 1 0 16 -180 -85.0 180.0 85.0 (note that this site's software has turned the ...


7

It is, but it requires a renderer running on your own computer. Maperitive is one option which runs on Windows, or Linux/Mac systems running Mono. Alternatively, projects such as Mapbox GL and Mapzen's Tangram are client-side renderers running off "vector tiles". This allows your styling to be applied in the browser or app. These are fairly young projects ...


7

You may check http://vterrain.org/Imagery/WholeEarth/ for links to satellite imagery, or http://www.naturalearthdata.com/downloads/10m-raster-data/ for raster images. These images can be tweaked in Photoshop to get your own look&feel and rendered with MapTiler into tiles - check http://examples.webglearth.com/#customtiles and esp. http://www.maptiler.com/...


7

I dont't know, but it's easy to do with osgeo.gdal, GeoPandas and shapely box ( shapely.geometry.box(minx, miny, maxx, maxy, ccw=True) = bounding box)¶ Original raster files import os StartDir = "/Shared/scan_ign/68" for dir, subdir, files in os.walk(StartDir): for fname in files: if fname.endswith(".tif"): print(fname,) 68_1....


7

You're asking two questions here: administrative borders related to territorial disputes, and map label localization. Since you mention OpenStreetMap, I feel obliged to answer: The OpenStreetMap Foundation changed the policy regarding territorial disputes in 2013. You can find the full document here, but let me quote the relevant paragraph: Borders and ...


6

I decided to provide some information on which way I finally went for my tiled map service. Pure JavaScript and GeoJSONs weren't a solution, because I have to handle roughly 40k polygons and 33k points. So I went for tiling. Oh, and I still don't have a access to root server, so I can't set up GeoServer or something similar (wouldn't be financially feasible ...


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