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13

SRTM tiles (3601 px * 3601 px in this case) have 1-pixel overlaps in between. When you apply transparency (or reduced opacity) to your hillshade layer, such overlapping pixels stand out. You may have observed this also on the original images, if you apply transparency (see below). ..... original SRTM, Pseudo-color + 60% opacity Anyway, you can avoid ...


7

You're asking two questions here: administrative borders related to territorial disputes, and map label localization. Since you mention OpenStreetMap, I feel obliged to answer: The OpenStreetMap Foundation changed the policy regarding territorial disputes in 2013. You can find the full document here, but let me quote the relevant paragraph: Borders and ...


4

It is possible. I recommend you to use Route 53, S3, CloudFront. Host your domain name on AWS via AWS Route 53 DNS (yourdomain.com) to create a public zone. Create a SSL Cert for your domain name via AWS ACM Create a S3 Bucket (yourdomain.com) with the same domain name and enable website hosting. Use the S3 Bucket Hosted Name to map into your recently ...


4

The layer info at the link you provide indicates the MapServer should provide tiles up to level 19, not 20 as you'd like. But that shouldn't create problems at level 17! However, I've played around with zooming in on the layer the QGis map window and it shows up at scales up to 1:6019, but not more detailed than that. So there's something funny with the ...


3

I just tried to install ipyleaflet with Jupyter 5.2.3: conda install -c conda-forge ipyleaflet and also didn't get a map. I then tried registering the extension with: jupyter nbextension enable --py --sys-prefix ipyleaflet since this is mentioned after the install with pip section. After restarting the kernel, the map was now displayed. Is ...


3

I presume you want the tile grid zoom, not view zoom, in which case you can replace url with a tileUrlFunction in the source: tileUrlFunction: function(tileCoord) { var x = ??? //some value depending on tileCoord[0] return 'http://localhost/cgi-bin/mapserv.exe?' + 'map=mapfile&' + 'mode=tile&' + '...


3

The Slippy Map tile naming is fairly simple: Starting with zoom 0, each tile is divided into 4 children, with the origin in the top-left corner (increasing south- and eastwards), thus for each zoom level, there are n = 2^zoom tiles representing your extend with your bounds, each tile represents (meter doesn´t matter for now) ts_x = (maxX - minX) / n ...


3

The quirky behaviours described by the questioner can be explained from the QGIS source codes. Here they are in simplified pseudocodes, with details omitted for clarity. 1. let pixelRatio = map view's pixres / raster layer's pixres, 2. let toUseRatio = smallest value between pixelRatio and Oversampling, // Assuming Zoom_In and/or Zoom_Out is not ...


3

The resolution of a computer screen is about 100 pixels per inch while a high quality print requires something like 300 or 600 PPI. The purpose of oversampling is to acquire more pixels from the area that is visible on screen for better quality printouts because what you see on screen is looking rather coarse on paper prints. If you collect four 256x256 ...


3

Short answer: Nope, it's just a convention. Long answer: They're called 'URL templates', and are related to the template processing functionality found in many programming languages. As of ES6 they're also supported natively by JavaScript, where they're sometimes known as template literals. While there is a standard for URL templating broadly, there isn'...


3

For QGIS 3.8 or greater, generating tiles is built in - you can find it in the Processing tool box as Generate XYZ tiles (Directory) and Generate XYZ tiles (MBTiles).


3

You can use this url as WMTS service in QGIS: https://tiles.arcgis.com/tiles/ULBqC49IEeIR01GF/arcgis/rest/services/Middle_East_Oil_and_Gas_Field_Map_by_CIA/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml?cacheKey=aec62228d3e2389d


3

As described by @Kazuhito, the tiles should be combined into a virtual raster. Their method is performed within QGIS. If you have a large number of tiles you may prefer to do this from the commandline. To do so open a shell in the directory containing the SRTM tiles and run gdalbuildvrt combined.vrt *.hgt The resulting virtual raster (combined.vrt) can ...


2

GDAL can create vector tiles with the MVT driver https://gdal.org/drivers/vector/mvt.html For converting GeoJSON data into vector tiles which are saved into MBTiles database file use a command like ogr2ogr -f MVT -dsco FORMAT=MBTILES -dsco MAXZOOM=10 target.mbtiles source.geojson Another option is to use Tippecanoe the https://github.com/mapbox/tippecanoe....


2

Some tasks are indeed better off processing tiles altogether so to avoid 'edge artifacts' (like creating a DEM). In this case, work with tiles using tools that can process them on-the-fly, like ArcGIS. Create a LAS Dataset and work form there. For example: Converting LiDAR data to raster (DEM/DSM) for ArcGIS input?. Or work on a full merged file. For ...


2

The only "solution" I've found (if you could call it that) in QGIS is to change the DPI of the Export Resolution under Export Settings in Layout Properties. Reducing the DPI will export a lower resolution layout but it will also change the zoom level of the basemap. To try to keep your data looking good you might want to try exporting to PDF first at the ...


2

Yes, slippy map tile names assume a Web (spherical) Mercator projection so you need to reproject the map. Having done that, this code converts latitude and longitude to slippy map tile numbers. The results (x,y) are reals with the fractional part being the location within the tile. But there are products - like MAPC2MAPC - that will both reproject and tile ...


2

You can add the map as "XYZ Tiles" layer using the following URL: https://tiles.arcgis.com/tiles/ULBqC49IEeIR01GF/arcgis/rest/services/Middle_East_Oil_and_Gas_Field_Map_by_CIA/MapServer/WMTS/tile/1.0.0/Middle_East_Oil_and_Gas_Field_Map_by_CIA/default/default028mm/{z}/{y}/{x}.png Notice the variables {z}, {y}, {x} at the end. I checked it using QGIS 3.4, ...


2

Ok, so I figured out what the problem was: apparently Leaflet was requesting JPEG images while the pre generated images were PNG's. After I changed the image file format from PNG to JPG it worked like a charm! So make sure the file types match if you have a similar problem.


2

So I just did a bit of Googling and have managed to get the XYZ URL to render in QGIS. However, I think there is a problem with the coordinate system. So long as you are making your own shapefiles, this shouldn't be a problem. If you're using imported shapefiles, it might be possible to manually move them into place within the Web Mercator projection because ...


2

As @Houska has noted the map service that you are using only provides tiles down to level 17. However, the data supplied in the map service is the USGS National Hydrography Dataset which is freely available to download in vector form, so if you want to generate tiles at any zoom level, this can be done by using a styled version of the vector NHD data.


2

Sentinel 1 products do not use a a tile grid. However, to identify products over your polygon you can use one of several Sentinel 1 search/download resouces. This is not an exhaustive list by any means. ESA offer the SciHub which allows searching by drawing a polygon area of interest (AOI). You have to create an account (free) before you can search and ...


2

You are looking for an image pyramid layer, there is a full tutorial in the manual as well.


1

Just use mapbox tippecanoe or GDAL Ogr2OGR to create your mbtiles vector tiles. There are tons of tile servers tile strata,tileserver-gl,tileserver-php,any language you want python, Go,nodejs,php


1

This question is vague, so there are too many answers. The first question is online or offline, i guess you want to capture google satellite or bing maps or else online, the easiest way programmatically is using WMTS service. I'm guessing you already know the bounding box of your desired screen which is going to show the images, you can convert this bounding ...


1

It is possible that the black lines are pixels with missing data (no data). In this case, some options are: i) start over by accessing the raw point cloud data and generate a DEM with a method that process tiles altogether so to avoid having edge's artifacts. Take a look at Merging multiple LiDAR (.las) files?. ii) interpolate (fill in no data values) ...


1

It seems that ArcGIS Desktop/Pro can generate tiles using the Manage Tile Cache tool which: Creates a tile cache or updates tiles in an existing tile cache. You can use this tool to create new tiles, replace missing tiles, overwrite outdated tiles, and delete tiles.


1

Here are some suggestions to test and try improving the processing workflow. Outliers The 'white specs' seem to be a consequence of having outliers in the raw point cloud. Have you checked them? You can look at the Las Dataset Properties, column 'Z Max' (see here). In case you find them, take a look at: Deleting anomalous points in *.lasd using ArcGIS ...


1

Type in a description as above and simply save the .mxd again then re-run tool. It will work even if you have left the tool open and all the parameters filled in.


1

The "Data driven pages" do exactly that. (but the output is PDF file if you need tif you will need to convert after the export...) You just need to create an index layer (in your case a grid representing the tile you want), create a layout you want and set the data driven page. When exporting your map, choose PDF as export format (that's the only one where ...


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