13

These are Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) state codes, and the ones you mention are missing because, from the wiki: "certain numeric codes "are reserved for possible future use in identifying American Samoa (03), Canal Zone (07), Guam (14), Puerto Rico (43), and Virgin Islands (52)", but these codes were omitted from FIPS PUB 5-2 without ...


6

I tried several coordinate systems for Florida and the various State Plane Florida East zone but the coordinates just didn't seem to fit. Google kept finding the address in Hempstead, NY, so I tried the Long Island zone, unit of US survey feet, and the results look good. Try EPSG::6539 for the NAD83 (2011) version or EPSG::2908 for NAD83 (HARN). For the ...


5

Disclosure: I work for Esri as a product engineer focusing on coordinate reference systems and transformations. Disclosure 2: I'm on the subcommittee that maintains the EPSG registry. You are correct. We have the same value for the false northing whether the unit of measure is US survey feet or meters. That is incorrect. The false easting/northing ...


4

As you already hint at in your question, there is really no "best" projection. What you use depends on the requirements of your project and how you want to display spatial data. That said, the most commonly used metric projected CRS for Chicago (and eastern Illinois more generally) are: NAD83 UTM Zone 16N (EPSG 26916) NAD83 StatePlane Illinois East FIPS ...


4

Due to some current hardware issues (I work for NRCS), all features of the Geospatial Datagateway may not work. https://nrcs.app.box.com/v/soils is a direct link to all downloadable soil products. Information on products available from the agency's Soil Survey Division can be found at https://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/HomePage.htm


3

Available for download by county here: https://datagateway.nrcs.usda.gov/GDGOrder.aspx If you want to use the data to it's full potential, use the soil data viewer, too: https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/soils/survey/geo/?cid=nrcseprd337066


2

Unless you work for the USPS and/or deliver mail you should avoid using zip codes for anything analytical. They change almost daily, and are actually not polygons, but household points, but vendors continue to draw polygons around them and call them 'zip code boundaries'. You'll find numerous sources of zip code polygons, all of which are different - Google,...


2

Data.gov is my first stop for US Federal government data. Searching for for "farm resource regions" yielded 19,446 results. Filtering by geospatial and agricultural narrowed it down to 4 search results. The first two sound promising: Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA) "The United States, Caribbean and Pacific Basin Major Land Resource Areas (MLRA) ...


2

According to the variable list at https://www2.census.gov/geo/tiger/TIGER_DP/2013ACS/Metadata/BG_Metadata_2013.txt, it should be the unweighted estimate of the total population.


2

If you're on linux, try converting .shp files downloaded directly from the census website to geoJSON data using the gdal command line tool. For Debian/Ubuntu that means installing the gdal-bin package, and then running a command like this one: ogr2ogr -f GeoJSON cb_2018_us_cbsa_20m.json cb_2018_us_cbsa_20m.shp


1

The REST service endpoint 'https://gis.blm.gov/arcgis/rest/services/Cadastral/BLM_Natl_PLSS_CadNSDI/MapServer' layer 3 has exactly what you're looking for: PLSS aliquot quarter-quarters.


1

Found the answer to my own question in here: https://www.blm.gov/services/geospatial/GISData/oregon


1

I don't really get why you can't use Geography data directly, and let Postgis do the work. This kind of computation usually work in a few ms, the computation itself is generally way less than or the other costs (like reading data). If you have performance issues, maybe the problem is not the projection but the request or the indexes. If you really are in a ...


1

Sadly, it is a past project, since abandoned. It started during the attempt at metrification initiated during the Ford presidency and largely abandoned during the Reagan presidency. Unfortunately the overall efforts of the Metric Conversion Act of 1975 and the US Metric Board were considered "voluntary" and did not gain traction, and did meet some political ...


1

See NOAA's website. This page has a link to a medium resolution shoreline that works well for teaching and basic visualization purposes. https://shoreline.noaa.gov/data/datasheets/medres.html Also, this is an appropriate place to introduce the concept of vertical datums with regards to how the shoreline is mapped. This particular file uses the "mean high ...


1

Assuming QGIS supports data frames you could use three of them with different extents (for contiguous states, Alaska and Hawaii ) on a layout, and then export that layout to a TIFF file.


1

This is actually three map projections. For example, Hawaii has been magnified and Alaska has been greatly reduced in size. So you cannot do this in the main map display, but you can produce maps for printout that look this by using the Composer and creating 3 inset maps. The Composer is essentially a Layout Manager intended to make final images, posters, ...


1

After more research, I found a thread on researchgate.net (https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_can_I_download_SRTM_data_of_30_m_resolution) which pointed me to OpenTopography (http://opentopo.sdsc.edu/raster?opentopoID=OTSRTM.042013.4326.1) which is a great website. On this site, it is possible to download elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography ...


1

As user2856 pointed out in the comment: You can just use the d3.geoAlbersUsa() projection and it will show Alaska and Hawaii on the bottom left. Take a look here for an explanation: https://github.com/d3/d3-geo#geoAlbersUsa And an example here: https://bl.ocks.org/mbostock/4090848


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