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46

right click on your layer in the left panel and select "save vector layer as" and choose wgs84(thats epsg:4326) under Selected crs:


39

Any equal-area projection will do the job well. There are loads of equal-area projections that cover the entire earth (minus a point or two). Many of them are versions of a Cylindrical Equal-Area projection (such as the Gall-Peters). You don't have to permanently reproject your polygons: create a temporary copy of the layer if you like, reproject it, ...


30

UTM uses a transverse Mercator projection with a scale factor of 0.9996 at the central meridian. In the Mercator, the distance scale factor is the secant of the latitude (one source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercator_projection), whence the area scale factor is the square of this scale factor (because it applies in all directions, the Mercator being ...


15

Just add the shapefiles to a project, check that they have the correct UTM CRS, then right-click on the layer -> Save as..., choose a destination and new filename, and WGS84 (EPSG:4326) as CRS for the output.


12

UTM 32U is one tile of the UTM 32N zone. This image from Wikipedia (here the link to the following image) should explain it clearly:


12

The UTM zones and their respective EPSG codes cover the whole area of their respecive zone from the equator to 84N / 80S. These areas are subdivided by the letters from South to North, and these again are subdivided into 100km grid squares, but the projection system is not affected by these subdivisions. Hence for 29U you can use EPSG:32629. For areas ...


10

Both coordinates are the same. As you are in the Southern Hemisphere a False Northing (of +10000000m) is usually applied to eliminate the negatives. The utm package applies the false Northing by itself. For Proj you need to specify it: >>> p = Proj(proj='utm', ellps='WGS84', zone='34H', south=True) >>> p(lon,lat) >>> (261762....


9

Your input coordinates are in the wrong order. Pyproj expects long, lat. >>> import pyproj >>> p = pyproj.Proj(init='epsg:32633') >>> p(*p(15.6, 58.4), inverse=True) (15.6, 58.399999999999991)


9

Simple. Don't use UTM projection if want to do some analysis on area falls under multiple UTM zones. You can use other projection in meters. LCC (Lambert Conformal Conic) is the official projection used in India. More information about LCC can be found here. There is also a comparison about commonly used projections in this pdf.


8

Imagine as if you were somewhere on Earth (easy to imagine I guess), and you have one world map on one hand and a compass on the other. GRID NORTH: the map you are holding has probably some horizontal and vertical lines. The direction of every vertical line indicates the grid north. So, for every point on the map, the vertical line that passes through that ...


8

I worked on updating some USGS quads, back in the 90s. It seemed like most of the style guidelines were published internally, long before the Internet, and never made it online. It's fairly common to show two sets of State Plane Coordinate System grid tics on quadrangles that are near a boundary between two zones. With UTM zones, it isn't such a big ...


8

Since QGIS version 2.14, the '$area', '$length' and '$perimeter' options are calculated based on the unit settings defined under 'Project > Project Properties' (see the changelog as well as the description in the image below). When you change the units in 'Measure Tool', it updates the values in 'Project Properties' and hence you are getting the output in ...


7

The latitude band is, strictly speaking, an MGRS thing, not a UTM thing. For UTM, all you need to know is which side of the equator you’re on, so for 29U, you can use EPSG:32629.


7

Following on Ian Turton's comment... Prior to performing ANY geometry calculations or analysis on a layer(s), the layer(s) MUST be 1) projected to the desired CRS, and 2) that CRS must be the same for all layers. (Sidenote #1: in QGIS, projecting a layer to a different CRS is typically accomplished using Save As...) Your analysis will always fail if the ...


6

To reproject a vector layer (or a batch of layers) (i.e. recalculate the coordinates values for a new reference system) you must go to Menu>Processing>Toolbox (this will open a side window). At processing toolbox search box, type 'reproject layer'. Choose 'reproject layer' algorithm from options bellow. A window will open: Select the layer to be reprojected....


6

The best way I can think is to get two UTM points, convert them to Lat/Long, and compare their geodesic distances to their UTM pythagorean distance. E.g. Take a point from this example: The CN Tower is ... in UTM zone 17, and the grid position is 630084m east, 4833438m north. So if we take A (17n 630084 4833438) and move it 30 km east, we get B (17n ...


6

I suggest to use UTM zone 35. The points fall inside the Zambia borders: For UTM Zone 34 and 36, the points would be outside of the country, shifted horizontally into the next UTM zone. The "Grid" could be some local kilometer-wide grid for finding streets and places. It seems to be build from a Northing coordinate, "c" and an Easting coordinate in ...


6

If the extent of your map falls within 2 UTM zones, and you are required to use a UTM projection, you could either: 1) Choose the defined UTM zone that more of your map extent falls within. For example, if you are between zones 34N and 35N and more of your map coverage is on the 34N side, create your map in the standard EPSG 32634 and specify that this was ...


6

The answer depends on what you mean by "origin" There are indeed 60 UTM zones numbered 1-60 and it starts at 180 W, so UTM zone 1 is used for longitude in [-180° -174°]. That being said, the origin of the center projection is located in the middle of the extent of each zone. The latitude of the center of projection remains 0 for all zones but the ...


6

As user30184 outlined: It's a very common task, and there's plenty of documentation: ST_Transform. To apply this, you need to figure out the EPSG codes of your projections. UTM 35N probably is EPSG:32635, and your lat/lon coordinates could be anything. One of the more common ones is WGS84 as used in GPS with code EPSG:4326 The Postgis query then would be ...


6

No, you need 14N (N is for Northern Hemisphere). The "Q" is just a latitude band designation. Latitude bands Latitude bands are not a part of UTM, but rather a part of the military grid reference system (MGRS). They are however sometimes used. Latitude bands Each zone is segmented into 20 latitude bands. Each latitude band is 8 degrees high,...


5

You seem to be getting confused between a geographic coordinate system, which is what EPSG:4326 represents, and a projected coordinate system. Looking at this answer might help. To recover the right projection parameters in this case, you need to know which zone your data is in, then use the -a_srs parameter with either EPSG:327xx for the southern ...


5

Entering UTM coordinates on this dialog is a little tricky: From the help on Using the Go to X, Y dialog box: Click the Units button to choose the units in which to enter coordinates. When using MGRS, USNG, or UTM locations, make sure there are no spaces in the coordinate string. Valid UTM coordinate notation input: 17N6734294749123 (1-...


5

We use 4647 in Lower Saxony, too. As far as i know, 4647 and 25832 only differ in representation, that is 4647 stores with preceeding zone number, whereas 25832 doesnt. So 25832 coordinate xxxxxx is 32xxxxxx in 4647. (Please note that some other EPSG codes for UTM32N, for example 5652, swich the N and E coordinates (thanks @Jens)) See http://www.epsg-...


5

If you need high accuracy distances, or "ground" distances, you need to convert your UTM "grid" distances (which you do indeed calculate via pythagorous) using a combined scale factor. This removes the distortion introduced by the combination of (a) reducing the horizontal distance at its elevated (above the ellipsoid) position on the earth and (b) ...


5

No, because UTM coordinates are repeated in each zone. If the data was localized--only covered the eastern and western parts of two zones, you might be able to do it because you could segregate the values into the two zones. If you had 539594, 9071398 and 493840, 9198483 are these in the same zone or in zones 31 and 32 or 10 and 11?


5

Don't choose UTM, end of story. Many large countries choose a single sensible projection for some tasks. Victoria, a small state in my country was extremely foresighted in the late 90's and chose a Lambert Conformal Conic projection suitable for state-wide usage when they were undergoing a datum shift (ADG84/66 to GDA94), rather than hobble along with ...


5

You use a UTM zone when your area of interest fits completely within it or very nearly so. A UTM zone is not appropriate when your area of interest spans several zones such as in your case. A little overlap into a neighboring zone might be ok, but the further away from the zone you pick, the more distortion there will be and the more it matters. I found this ...


5

The first (WGS 1984 UTM 33 North) has map units of meters, while the second has decimal degrees. If you're talking about a two-dimensional display, the WGS 1984 (decimal degree) data is often displayed using a "pseudo-Plate Carrée" projection. That is, the decimal degrees are treated as if they're linear units and the features are just displayed. A standard ...


5

There are a number of gridding systems which start with UTM zones (which are just the 6 degree bands from the South Pole to the North Pole). The Military Grid Reference System (MGRS) is probably the most famous, and the NGA web site description helps to show how UTM zones are sliced into letters, then map grid designators. Taken from the NGA site, this is ...


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