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9

It is partially explained here http://www.gistutor.com/quantum-gis/20-intermediate-quantum-gis-tutorials/51-inverse-distance-weighting-idw-interpolation-using-qgis.html by first showing examples of using coefficient values of 1 and 3, and then As you can see, a larger coefficient means it takes a larger distance for the values of the surface to become ...


7

NOAA's National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center has an interesting daily snowfall dataset. Their daily archive is in KML format and goes back to 2005.


7

You can get tabular (in HTML format) tide predictions from BOM. Maybe an HTML scraper like BeautifulSoup could parse it for you. An example of accessing the tabular tide predictions for Botany Bay:http://www.bom.gov.au/cgi-bin/oceanography/tides/tide_predications.cgi?location=nsw_60390&tide_hiddenField=New%20South%20Wales&years=2012&months=Feb&...


5

EarthNetworks Earth Networks Total Lightning NetworkTM (ENTLN) "incorporates patent pending systems and methods for the detection of lightning activity to provide unmatched global IC and CG detection efficiency. It is the first integrated in-cloud (IC) lightning and cloud-to-ground (CG) detection network deployed on a global basis capable of detecting ...


4

Anyone looking at this question from the UK should check out the Met Offices excellent DataPoint service, which provides (for free) a lightning strikes layer (15 minute updates with 15 minute delay for processing, based on strikes per minute) amongst many other things. All you need is a free API key and you can access up to date information for the UK, and ...


3

I think it depends a lot on your target audience, but I don't think you can say this in general. In aviation (ICAO) and "real" weather (WMO) definitions, visibility is a distance. There is a pretty good wikipedia article on Visibility. It is also possible to represent visibility as a probability of a certain distance being achieved (e.g. probability of 5km ...


3

I'd go with the colour ramp from NOAA, from the suppliers of your data, Example for Significant Wave http://polar.ncep.noaa.gov/waves/viewer.shtml?-multi_1-NE_atlantic- I've spoken to a supplier of weather assets about this and their comment was "Pick your own colours" there's no standard. There is some interpolation going on in the NOAA viewer, and your ...


3

From the looks of it, you are getting a python error because the headers argument is expecting a dictionary, not a string The following works for me on the entire date range: import requests url = "http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdo-web/api/v2/data?datasetid=GHCNDMS&locationid=ZIP:28801&startdate=2000-01-01&enddate=2010-01-01" # replace 'myToken' ...


3

You should also try Open Meteo Foundation API. It covers all Europe On the same web site, you can also get raw data for forecast using their server. The licence is really open e.g https://openmeteoforecast.org/wiki/License


3

Parse (using python/etc) RSS feeds from local authorities. Tough, but free. It's a bit of work up front, but then you can write the data directly into your own feature classes, and reserve yourself. Kind of like ESRI's new geoEvent processor Server extension, but all custom through python. I update my services every hour - so far so good. I pull about 500 ...


3

NOAA's NowCoast has an ESRI mapping service that contains lightning strikes from their GOES Satellite: https://nowcoast.noaa.gov/arcgis/rest/services/nowcoast/sat_meteo_emulated_imagery_lightningstrikedensity_goes_time/MapServer/


3

Weatherbug Professional has a paid lightning strike service: Current Lightning - Lightning latitude/longitude, strength and type (cloud-to-ground, cloud-tocloud) of strikes that have occurred in the last 2 minutes. 15 Minute Lightning - Lightning latitude/longitude, strength and type (cloud-to-ground, cloudto-cloud) of strikes that have occurred in the ...


3

If you are using ArcGIS you would find these tools in the Spatial Analyst toolbar > Interpolation. You will input your featureclass containing the wind data, your Z value will be your wind speed, and then choose your output FC which is where you will save it. Some choices have to be made as to your interpolation type. IDW is best for a dense sample set, ...


3

I eventually ended up with ditching gribapi and switching to Met Office's Iris Python package which solves my problem in a very elegant way. Although it was a bit of a pain to install it (dependencies could be really tricky) at least the documentation is good and it is really easy to use it.


3

Another idea would be to use pygrib module: import pygrib grbs= pygrib.open("my_file.grb") # use grbs.select to select the grids you are interested in (shortName, typeOfLevel, level=500, marsParam, dataDate, dataTime, ...) DATA=np.array(grbs.select(marsParam=my_param,dataDate=my_date,dataTime=my_time)) # DATA will contain 3 ...


2

You don't tell us anything about the usage of these maps. Do you just want to produce a map? Will you use them as a model input? This may change your methodology. Which error is acceptable for the usage you need? Topography can only be included if you use it as an input variable, in a procedure called regression kriging. I don't know whether arcgis supports ...


2

GribApi.NET is now freely available. It supports reading and writing GRIB 1 and 2 files. Disclosure: I am the author of the C# wrapper.


2

At the bottom of this page there are a lot of references to additional sites in Europe and the US: European lightning detection networks, reference links WWLN Current lightning ORF.at European lightning Euclid Current lightning, 1 hr delayed Siemens Partial coverage, 30 minutes delay MeteoTest Lightning in Switzerland AEMet Spain Lightning in ...


2

Canada - Canadian Lightning Detection Network United States - National Lightning Detection Network Which together comprise "the North American Lightning Detection Network (NALDN) that monitors lightning in most of North America. The NALDN is the largest lightning detection network in the world." (though it's not mentioned if Mexico participates). The US ...


2

Could also try the Navy Meteorology site http://www.metoc.gov.au/products.php They have a ton of marine data


2

This best resource for publicly available data is going to be from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, but that isn't going to cover all the altitudes you are looking for. NREL wind data page NREL's data is based on a model developed by AWS Truepower, which sells a more comprehensive dataset, but I don't know if it will cover everything you need. AWS ...


2

I figured out where I went wrong. I forgot to set my limit for the data, so by default the limit was set up to be 25. This was the reason why I was getting data just for the first month. Thanks for your help.


2

You can generate your own wms using the Met Office (UK) DataPoint API "DataPoint is a way of accessing freely available Met Office data feeds in a format that is suitable for application developers. It is aimed at professionals, the scientific community and student or amateur developers, in fact anyone looking to re-use Met Office data within ...


2

ArcGIS supports spheres or ellipsoids (spheroids) with the azimuthal equidistant projection. Here's a sample prj (wkt) string for "World_Azimuthal_Equidistant" based on WGS 1984. PROJCS["World_Azimuthal_Equidistant", GEOGCS["GCS_WGS_1984", DATUM["D_WGS_1984", SPHEROID["WGS_1984",6378137.0,298.257223563]], PRIMEM["Greenwich",0.0], UNIT["Degree",0....


2

You can download recent history from NOMADS for a range of models, including GFS 0.5 and 1.0 degree. Your download options include FTP, HTTP, GrADS and THREDDS. Depending on what you need, a query into THREDDS might save you a lot of download - worth a look if you have seen it before. The data is readily available for a bit less than a year (as of Dec 2015, ...


2

The GFS and other forecast models (such as the RAP, HRRR, etc) all "measure" altitude in millibars, and there is no direct correlation between pressure and altitude in feet. Moreover, the forecast is intended to be accurate at that pressure; not at any specific altitude. One reason for this is because atmospheric conditions are dependent upon pressure, but ...


2

From the GeoSolutions' blog the answer is yes. Much of the complexity the wind barbs example you link to is converting the velocity raster into points. You don't need any of that as you already have points with direction and speed. THere isn't much documentation on windbarbs but basically you use the windbarbs:// prefix, and follow it with default(speed)[...


2

The SNOTEL network measures snow depth and equivalent water content at numerous places in the US west. Check this page for the location of stations and the years of coverage. Note that these are point readings and do not reflect on the snow depth over a broad region or state.


1

You have to specify the projection on a sphere, because proj seems to only support the spherical formulas of this projection: +proj=aeqd +R=6371000 +lat_0=51.0246 +lon_0=-113.3981 For some example plots, see Manipulating Azimuthal Equidistant Projections in QGIS


1

I think you are looking for something like http://openweathermap.org/Maps?zoom=10&lat=51&lon=7&layers=B0TTTFFT which also provides a Server API for accessing the data. http://www.wetterpool.de also combines and displays a lot of European weather information. I guess you have to understand German to benefit from that.


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