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I am new to ArcGIS and ArcPy (just started using them on Wednesday).

I am using a model to create a Point Density plot from a Shape File, with the output being a Raster dataset.

I want to convert the Raster dataset into a new layer and modify the properties.

Is there a function that converts Raster datasets into layers, or is there another way to do it?

It is clear the the model is just a starting point, and that I have to add Python code for it to do what I want it to do.

  • When you say convert it to a layer, do you mean vector data or literally just a raster layer? – Evil Genius Jul 11 '14 at 17:30
  • Literally just a raster layer. Doing it manually, after loading the Shape File, I run the point Density tool, which results in the Raster Layer. Then I right click on the Raster Layer I choose Properties and change the properties. Running a model with the Shape file and the Point Density function only results in an output Raster, which I can display, but I want to do further processes with the Raster Layer itself. – user3429841 Jul 11 '14 at 17:37
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The raster equivalent to the Make Feature Layer tool that is often mentioned on this site is Make Raster Layer (Data Management):

Creates a raster layer from an input raster dataset or layer file. The layer that is created by the tool is temporary and will not persist after the session ends unless the layer is saved to disk or the map document is saved.

This tool can be used to make a temporary layer, so you can work with a specified subset of bands within a raster dataset.

There are two ArcPy code samples included as part of the documentation linked to above.

However, I am not certain that this tool was available in ArcGIS Desktop 10.0.

  • Thank you. The MakeRasterLayer_management function is what I was looking for. – user3429841 Jul 14 '14 at 14:30

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