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13

I saw this answer on the Openlayers mailing list a few days ago. You need to make sure you are providing a version, such as v=3.6: <script type="text/javascript" src="http://maps.googleapis.com/maps/api/js?sensor=false&v=3.6"></script> Then it should disappear. -- May 17, 2012 edit: I just saw that this problem has returned on the ...


5

Basically you want to use the projectGeometry method from the AGSGeometryEngine class to convert from the GPS coordinate system to the coordinate system used by your map. Use the defaultGeometryEngine for this. Assuming your GPS is giving you WGS-84 coordinates you could do something like this: CLLocation* gpsLocation = .... // create a AGSPoint from the ...


5

Using the Mapquest Open XAPI you can retrieve XML for specific tags within a Bounding Box. using http://open.mapquestapi.com/xapi/api/0.6/way%5Bwaterway=canal%5D%5Bbbox=-77.09307755077849,38.86329811515983,-76.95574844922147,38.92342116108839%5D (based on the OpenStreetMap setup) http://open.mapquestapi.com/xapi/api/0.6/way%5Bwaterway=canal%5D%5Bbbox=-77....


5

I've done exactly the same thing for the same purposes - creating GIS-based rock climbing guides using GPS points taken with a mobile phone. I collected my points using an iPhone and the iGIS app. What I liked about iGIS was its ability to read/write directly to shapefiles, so you can get your attribute schema all setup outside of the app. Screenshot of ...


5

Your hypothesis is conceptually correct. GPS is a one-way system, with your phone listening to satellites broadcasting hyper-accurate timestamps from orbiting atomic clocks. A regular GPS unit can take 10+ minutes to download the latest satellite positioning information (almanac and ephemeris) needed for triangulation. This can lead to very long delay before ...


5

GeoTools is a Java library which can read and write GeoJSON and provides access to features like area via the JTS library. It will also help you to reproject the geometries from the lat/lon of GeoJSON to a suitable projection for calculating areas in m^2.


4

Latitude and Longitude can be in many projections, however in the case of the iPhone (and any other mobile device for that matter) it is most likely WGS84 coming from the device's GPS and would therefore be EPSG:4326. EPSG:900913 and EPSG:3857 are both Web Spherical Mercator projections and are based on metres and not degrees. Ordinarily you would need to ...


4

You can buy high resolution satellite images from DigitalGlobe or GeoEye. You are not limited to these two map providers. There are too many options outside of these. You can also try Google Earth Pro for exporting images and with your license you can use Google Earth Pro images and data for marketing purposes as long as this data is not sold to any third ...


4

Not sure if this is "legal" but i just made it go away with CSS. .olLayerGoogleCopyright {display:none;} UPDATE Apparently this violates the terms of use: By doing so, you violate the Terms of Use. Instead, you should use a more recent version of OpenLayers - this problem was fixed in 2.11. Are you using 2.11? Apparently it's no longer a problem. -...


4

Now you can also use Overpass API to query and export OSM data by tags like "canal" (and also by area). It is more suitable for small to mid-size selections. There is a easy-to-use user interface called Overpass Turbo, where you can type Overpass API queries and immediately display the selection on map. Below is an example query that return all ways and ...


4

The XAPI is a good way of going about it. If you have some time to kill and a speedy computer, you can experiment with doing your own extracts from the full Planet (http://planet.openstreetmap.org). The tool to use for that is called Osmosis (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Osmosis/Detailed_Usage), and you can use its tag filter feature to pull just the ...


4

I can recommend iGIS It's free (at the moment), and is pretty easy to use. You can store your own tiles on it as well, but I don't think it can connect to other tile servers, it just uses the default Google maps or Google satellite. At the moment there is no WMS or WFS support. It imports and exports Shapefiles, but under the hood it uses Sqlite. More ...


4

The ArcGIS app lets you view web maps, not web mapping applications. Web mapping applications are composed of HTML, Javascript and CSS and are accessed from a device's web browser. Here's an example of a web mapping application: http://keller.maps.arcgis.com/apps/PublicInformation/index.html?appid=6061c77c5f2e4b219e9ec91f9d4acd0c It is designed to work ...


4

tl;dr Does iOS know the phone's location solely from cell tower, i.e. without GPS data? Yes, iOS does, using Assisted GPS (Wikipedia, dmahr). How it works The article Deeper insights into Apple’s “GPS” explains how it works: All iPhones scan their environment for WiFi access points and cell towers and their signal strengths. If there is GPS ...


4

You can do this several ways, I think that the easiest (if you only have a few GIS things to do) is to use Turf see here There are also a couple of GIS library whom are a bit heavier (size wise) leaflet: how to After you can also try openlayers3


3

GPS recording Apps for iPhone Use can you the many apps that can 'make' tracks/waypoints using the iPhone Specific to your needs is Locations Tagger "It is primarily designed to map POIs for OpenStreetMap in a very fast and easy way. You can currently export your POIs via email in a gpx file and edit it with an OSM-editor of your choice. " http://wiki....


3

The same question (for Android only) was asked on the main site: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3052517/how-is-location-accuracy-measured-in-android The only relevant piece of information is in paracycle's comment, which shows he actually inspected the code, which seems to be passing CEP directly from the hardware.


3

In this case you might be more precise if you fine tune your points on a computer later. For example try to note the position of the point relatively to a tree or any other significant feature in the landscape. Anyway, even if you position your point perfectly at the right place, it is very likely that the user of your guide won't have a better GPS than ...


3

I agree with mapbarker and say TileMill would be the best route. However the problem you have is that the original raster files are in British National grid (epsg:27700) and need to be warped to the google sperical mercator projection (epsg:3857) The MapBox team have a good tutorial on this - https://www.mapbox.com/tilemill/docs/guides/reprojecting-geotiff/ ...


3

For Android, we looked into this a few years ago (circa 2014): https://github.com/CUTR-at-USF/OpenTripPlanner-for-Android/issues/356 We ended up just using raster tiles, but we were looking at the below tools to potentially do vector rendering at that time: Mapzen Vector Tile service - https://github.com/tilezen/vector-datasource/wiki/Mapzen-Vector-Tile-...


2

As answered already, you can use the 2 notifications: AGSMapViewDidEndPanningNotification and AGSMapViewDidEndZoomingNotification However, if you need more immediate feedback you can add an observer to the AGSMapVeiw's visibleAreaEnvelope property: [self.mapView addObserver:self forKeyPath:@"visibleAreaEnvelope" options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew context:...


2

According to the class reference for AGSMapView, there are two NSNotifications that are broadcast whenever the map pans or zooms to a new extent. Set up a listener for those notifications. The map component also broadcasts 2 notifications - AGSMapViewDidEndPanningNotification and #AGSMapViewDidEndZoomingNotification .


2

[see note above re: needing more detail. this is just one possible implementation]. Implement a native-like app with HTML5 + CSS + Javascript (yey, easy stuff, no Objective C) and then wrap it in WebView and you have an "app". Want it the easy way? Take the OpenLayers mobile map sample and modify. http://openlayers.org/dev/examples/mobile-jq.html#...


2

First how are you planning to connect the external GPS to your iOS device? Because you either have to purchase an external GPS that already has the capability to connect to an iOS device, or the GPS device can transmit the location via Bluetooth Low Energy (LE). Apple doesn't allow any device to communicate with their iOS devices unless it's part of the ...


2

Fulcrum from Spatial Networks is really nice, the form builder is top notch http://spatialnetworks.com/products/fulcrum/ If you need it synchronized with a local ArcGIS, we're adding a Fulcrum provider to Arc2Earth Sync in the next version cheers


2

I've put a lot of time into trying to get route-me to render vectors. In my opinion using the built in vector rendering, RMPath and markers does not scale to the amount of data needed to render a map. That doesn't mean that route-me isnt an isn't an option, you could use mapnik to do the rendering, then pass the data to route-me to render. As of now there ...


2

The Collector for ArcGIS supports maps with multiple tiled layers. It currently doesn't have offline maps but that will be supported in an update being released this month.


2

If you use ArcGIS, you could try CarryMap. It is a software tool to export a map from ArcGIS to a mobile device. It supports multiple raster layers. Although you cannot alter the transparency of layers on the mobile device, their transparency is preserved. So if the corresponding ArcGIS raster layers had a transparency setting, the raster is shown with ...


2

MapBox open-source stack seems to be quite performant indeed - and used in production by many. If you want to host your own OSM tileserver have a look at our project http://osm2vectortiles.org/. You can get there downloadable vector tiles for world or countries - and free software to host it (or generate the vector tiles on your own). We work now on ...


2

SpatiaLite ,a spatial extension to SQLite is the best option for mobile applications.


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