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Disclaimer: Any method you use to do this, especially with a consumer GPS unit, is going to be an approximation at best. If you truly want to know where the boundaries are, you will need to locate property pins/corners which might require a metal detector. Your best, safest option is to hire a professional land surveyor. No, those are not lat/longs in the ...


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You need to know the coordinates of at least one point in lat/lon degrees. If you don't have any surveying points, you might take coordinates from a GPS unit if the point is visible. Using QGIS, you could create the other points of the polygon with the Azimuth and Distance Plugin. Take care to convert the degree-minute bearings into decimal degrees. With ...


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Likely, you'll need to change the angular units setting for editing, as found here. Now, you can use the traverse window as such: If you look here, you'll see there is shorthand for entering bearing and distances, so S01.4146W becomes 01.4146-3 where the -# corresponds to the quadrant, with the quadrants being defined as (1=NE 2=SE 3=SW 4=NW)


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I'm pretty sure Paul has the correct solution for why you can't add the information you're entering - the units / angle format. Do note that you need to be in a projected coordinate system to input these types of descriptions, one that uses the units you have (ie feet or meters - in the US, a State Plane zone for your area is the safest bet). However I do ...


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According to Map Check in Copan User Manual, each call is of the form to-point bearing distance <blank> <blank> <blank> as you (sort of) say. However, the first "call" must have (only) the initial start point (and optional label): from-point <blank> <blank> trav-label <blank> <blank> In other words, a traverse ...


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The legal description is giving you a delta angle of the curve, the radius, and the distance traveled along the curve. Simple Curve Formula: R = Radius L = Length of Curve D = Degree of Curve T = Tangent Long Chord = LC From your data you have a 180 ft radius curve that has a 98 degree delta angle since the bearing entering the curve is 98 degrees less ...


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Legal plans (plats) and legal descriptions are not in any projection (grid) system; they are on a local, ground-based plane. Hence the need for grid-to-ground and ground-to-grid conversions. As a minimum, there are usually scaling and rotation issues to deal with. So, it is quite possible that neither GIS nor legal description are wrong. Once we get more ...


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There are a couple of ways to go about it I think. COGO is one way. It stands for "coordinate geometry" and is essentially a suite of tools designed specifically around digitizing parcels such as you're describing. Wha'ts nice is you can have a whole table put together of bearings and distances, which minimizes the possibility of error. Unfortunately, the ...


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As suggested by @Erica, COGO tools are what I would ideally use for this type of work. However, being limited to a Basic License, COGO tools in ArcMap are not available to me. I found this blog explaining a workaround for such a situation. It explains how to adjust your editing tools so that you can do what I mentioned above: "type in those numbers and ...


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The problem in your example is that you actually have insufficient information given to construct the curve, at least which is shown in the image. You need at least three values to construct a curve - two to define and one for direction - and you only have two. There are a couple of possible solutions. The first, in this specific example, would be to ...


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If you're using a Standard or Advanced license, then yes, you can easily convert a polygon into a metes and bounds description via one of two methods. First relies on the COGO tools, specifically Traverse. In edit session, double click the polygon in question to enter vertex editing mode. Launch the Traverse tool on the COGO toolbar, then right-click in the ...


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If you are starting with a polygon I would convert it into line segments. Then I believe you can use the Inverse tool which is available in the Advanced Editing Toolbar. The tool calculates the coordinate geometry values for selected line features by inverting the geometry of the features. The values calculated include the direction and length for straight ...


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This is a rather broad question, so I'm not going into too much detail here. These instruction assume ArcMap, not ArcGIS Pro. Create a polygon feature class In ArcMap, open the Catalog window (Windows → Catalog) In the Catalog Window, browse to the location where you want to store the data; click right: New → File Geodatabase. You may have to connect a ...


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Typically, if there is no Coordinate System indicated, a local datum is used. When i draw those, I look for statements in the legal description that indicate what the local datum might be. This could be, for example: Commencing at the southeat corner of Soandso's Addition, as the same is platted and recorded in the office of the Recorder, Thence North ...


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I had this same issue but contacted the developers and now this has been corrected. You will need to update to version 0.9.11 of the plugin.


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I have that code. You would convert your polygon to points and run the tool on the points. The tool requires that the points have a number of attributes pre-populated with X and Y values in decimal degrees. There also need to be fields to hold the azimuth and one to hold the distances but that is spelled out in the comments of the code. The script will ...


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For the particular call you've provided, try this this format: in the Traverse window, select the Direction-Distance from the drop down menu, then enter Direction: S01-41-46W Distance: 25 Hopefully the Add button won't be grayed out.


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The math in the answer by @user30641 is correct. The given arc length was redundant but useful as a check. In case it helps, there's another free online tool for deed plotting at underhill.ca/map_check.php. It allows you to enter curve data via the "in" and "out" radial lines, derivable from the metes in your description via simple addition/subtraction. (...


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Manually converting bearings can be error-prone, as exemplified by some of your conversions, above: Bearing S 05° 52' 13" E converts to azimuth 174° 07' 47" and not 174° 01' 47". Also, bearing N 50°17'08" W converts to azimuth 309° 42' 52" and not 309° 42' 42". However, as Chris says, you can enter quadrant-based bearings in Copan without having to ...


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The '360 degree basis' is known as azimuth, or clockwise/east degrees from north. The 'normal bearings' are known as quadrant bearings or degrees east/west of north/south. This page I found on a quick search graphically depicts the two. Survey bearings are given in a direction, but the line can be read in two directions by reversing both cardinals. The key ...


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I did a quick glance at the code for the tool. It appears that default/feet choice is to specify a fixed conversion between feet and meters. This would make sense, because as I mentioned earlier in the context of metes-and-bounds you're usually using one of those units (or something archaic like chains or rods). But line 189 of the source code is just a ...


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Let me first say I'm not a surveyor or an expert on the use of Parcel Fabrics. A basis of bearing is not a rotation factor for a parcel fabric. It applies individually to each plan/plat/whatever as a source going into the fabric. Old 10.0 help file on the specific tool describes some of it, and portions of that got incorporated into this newer 10.2 help ...


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With ArcGIS you can use the Snap tool, which will do exactly what you need but is only available with Standard and Advanced licences. If you don't have this licences, you could use integrate, but then you don't have the control on which vertex is moving. Note that both tools modify your data, so you better work on a copy of your dataset.


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Yes, there is. If you did not save your traverse to a text file when finished, you can: be in an Edit Session, have the Traverse dialog open and blank select the shape you want the calls for and enter edit vertice mode (ie, double click the shape) in the Traverse tool, right-click the description window and choose Load Traverse from Sketch You can then ...


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These are the coordinates from Ukwu-Oba that have been planted. Pt"A"(1) 6.11931381N 6.50480513E or Lat.6° 03'23."N Long.6°.30'26.8"E pt.(2) 6.0571400N 6.5071078E and 6°.03'16.7"N 6°30"25•6'E pt(3)6•0568894N 6•5076962E (pt4)6•056840N 6•508229E .(pt5) B∆~start to C∆6•054706N 6•510544E C2;-6•059036N 6•510204E close up to Highway. Adonte Rd. Start D to A 6•...


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There is a free online tool at Underhill's map check page I used your metes data, but started at A.4589 (the one with known coordinates) and got these results (the remaining point numbers are assumed to increase by one each time, and luckily they do match the raw data numbering): Azimuth Distance Pt# Northing Easting ...


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I don't have ArcMap Basic, but I'm assuming that once you have the units set, you can use the directions here for constructing segments with the direction-distance tool?


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If you have access to ArcGIS, there are tools to do this. At the Standard/Editor and Advanced/Info levels the COGO tools are available, one of which is the Traverse tool. With proper formating, you can directly load your calls into the tool and have it create the shape, give closure information, and make a closure adjustment. Examples of ArcGIS traverse ...


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