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10

There isn't any tool to do this in 1 single step, you should either: convert your text file to points convert points to lines with Points to Line convert lines to polygons with Feature to Polygon (Advanced licnese required) Or: Use arcpy :) - no specific license required. See an example at the bottom of the page Writing geometries. The code converts a ...


8

For a line, it is a plunge and not a dip (for 3D planes) It is an elementary problem in analytic geometry: The distance = SQRT((x2 –x1)2+(y2 –y1)2+(z2 –z1)2) The plunge = arcsin ((z2 – z1) / distance) The azimuth = arctan((x2 –x1)/(y2 –y1)) (always in two dimensions) The value θ returned will be in the range of ±90° and must be corrected to give ...


6

Likely, you'll need to change the angular units setting for editing, as found here. Now, you can use the traverse window as such: If you look here, you'll see there is shorthand for entering bearing and distances, so S01.4146W becomes 01.4146-3 where the -# corresponds to the quadrant, with the quadrants being defined as (1=NE 2=SE 3=SW 4=NW)


5

I'm pretty sure Paul has the correct solution for why you can't add the information you're entering - the units / angle format. Do note that you need to be in a projected coordinate system to input these types of descriptions, one that uses the units you have (ie feet or meters - in the US, a State Plane zone for your area is the safest bet). However I do ...


5

To get the coordinates of the points you can use these equations: Delta Y = Distance * Cos (Azimuth) Delta X = Distance * Sin (Azimuth) New Y = Y + Delta Y New X = X + Delta X First you'll have to get the coordinates of B using these equations then go from there to C.


4

COGO it is only available for ArcGIS Desktop Standard and ArcGIS Desktop Advanced Matrix PDF http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/arcgis-for-desktop/~/media/files/pdfs/library/brochures/pdfs/arcgis1021-desktop-functionality-matrix.pdf


4

Legal plans (plats) and legal descriptions are not in any projection (grid) system; they are on a local, ground-based plane. Hence the need for grid-to-ground and ground-to-grid conversions. As a minimum, there are usually scaling and rotation issues to deal with. So, it is quite possible that neither GIS nor legal description are wrong. Once we get more ...


4

According to Map Check in Copan User Manual, each call is of the form to-point bearing distance <blank> <blank> <blank> as you (sort of) say. However, the first "call" must have (only) the initial start point (and optional label): from-point <blank> <blank> trav-label <blank> <blank> In other words, a traverse ...


4

Azimuth and Distance has since been ported to QGIS 2.0. The version of the plugin you need is 0.9.0 or later.


3

The legal description is giving you a delta angle of the curve, the radius, and the distance traveled along the curve. Simple Curve Formula: R = Radius L = Length of Curve D = Degree of Curve T = Tangent Long Chord = LC From your data you have a 180 ft radius curve that has a 98 degree delta angle since the bearing entering the curve is 98 degrees less ...


3

Yes, there is. If you did not save your traverse to a text file when finished, you can: be in an Edit Session, have the Traverse dialog open and blank select the shape you want the calls for and enter edit vertice mode (ie, double click the shape) in the Traverse tool, right-click the description window and choose Load Traverse from Sketch You can then ...


3

Let's start by providing some missing details (because I doubt most readers know what the Tienstra resection problem is). There are three control points A, B, C, visible from an unknown point P. Angles at P between points A, B, C are observed, via theodolite or sextant, as α, β, γ. Angles at the corners of the triangle ABC are calculated, ...


3

There are a couple of ways to go about it I think. COGO is one way. It stands for "coordinate geometry" and is essentially a suite of tools designed specifically around digitizing parcels such as you're describing. Wha'ts nice is you can have a whole table put together of bearings and distances, which minimizes the possibility of error. Unfortunately, the ...


3

This is basically the same thing I said here, just modified to produce the end point instead of a line: SELECT objectid, ST_SetSRID(ST_Translate(ST_Rotate(ST_MakePoint(-1 * dist_field,0.0), radians(bearing_field)), ST_X(the_geom), ST_Y(the_geom)),ST_SRID(the_geom)) AS end_point_geom ...


3

The question is pretty complicated. What you are asking about is calculations on the surface of the Earth, which is called spherical trigonometry. To get even more precise you need to use an ellipsoidal model of the Earth. I'd suggest you use a program that can already do this for you, but if you want to do it yourself, here's a link to start on. The ...


3

Delta is the angle from the center of a theoretical circle on which each curve lies. For each curve, imagine two straight line segments of length Radius that converge at the center of the circle, and whose ends are at opposite ends of the arc curve. The angle where they converge will be delta. The imaginary straight line between them (right next to the ...


3

I sometimes call these "local coordinate reference systems" as they're designed to be used in this particular area and may not have any connection to a coordinate reference system that covers a larger area. There's usually a point-of-beginning (POB) and then metes and bounds (angles and distances) are used to survey the rest of the property / subdivision / ...


3

Probably you can do this in two steps: [Step 1] Create a series of points layer (Pt1, Pt2, ...) [Step 2] Build the polygon at each point geometry from [Step 1]. Let me try to provide an answer for the [Step 2] part... building the ship ... if I can call them ships. Tool is Geometry by expression in the Processing Toolbox >> Vector geometry. combine( ...


2

In the Excel spreadsheet I'll add a column for each register for X and Y (or longitude and latitude). I calculate this cells with X = Xcourt house + distance * sin(bearing or direction) Y = Ycourt house + distance * cos(bearing or direction) Then I'll export to a CSV file and import it to QGIS with delimited text file. If you put on CSV file headers "X" ...


2

Use the ST_Project() function: geography ST_Project (geography geog, float distance, float azimuth); It returns a point "projected" from a start point using a distance in meters and bearing (azimuth) in radians. You may need to first cast your geometry to a geography goem::geography convert your azimuth from degrees to radians radians (azimuth) and ...


2

Assuming that we're dealing with the planar coordinate case (that is not actually what the OP suggested, but I offer this as a better answer to the one given so far – and so far, accepted, by the OP – for the planar case), it helps to first determine the direction cosines from the two clockwise bearings, βAC and βBC, from known points A ...


2

As suggested by @Erica, COGO tools are what I would ideally use for this type of work. However, being limited to a Basic License, COGO tools in ArcMap are not available to me. I found this blog explaining a workaround for such a situation. It explains how to adjust your editing tools so that you can do what I mentioned above: "type in those numbers and ...


2

COGO is not a format I have ever used but a quick look at the ArcObjects API documentation threw up this interface ICadastralCogoImporter. May be this is what you need along with the ICadastralImporter interface? I would be surprised if arcpy expose these specialized interfaces. Maybe someone else reading this has more experience?


2

I have a Create Points on Lines toolbox I made that should work for you. You can download it here: http://ianbroad.com/arcgis-toolbox-create-points-polylines-arcpy/ Here's the script: http://ianbroad.com/download/script/CreatePointsLines.py Here's a screenshot of the parameters: You'll want to use the Type of INTERVAL. For the interval value, if your ...


2

If you are working from land survey plats, the basis of bearing, even though it is referenced to California Grid Zone 5, should have a starting, or reference line for the basis of bearing. This should be at the beginning of the description for the easement. It may start at a section corner, or some other aliquot corner, and describe the traverse to the ...


2

I am not from California but in my state the declination should be listed on the plat or record of instrument, at least it usually is. If not I believe this may help, put in the area the survey was done and the date it was done and it should give you declination. NGS has alot of cool tools btw http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/geomag-web/ The difference between ...


2

Legal descriptions have bearings and distances, not rectangular coordinates. While the bearings may be similar to those of some projected coordinate system, they are usually only correct relative to existing bearing lines on a cadastral map. Also, while the distances will be similar to those of some projected coordinate system, they are "ground" distances ...


2

In the Attribute Table view, if you right-click a column, you will see Calculate Geometry, Length is an option. Also, if you put your data into a file geodatabase, ArcGIS will automatically add a column Shape_length for you. Just another benefit of using a File Geodatabase.


2

According to desktop.arcgis.com/en/arcmap/10.3/manage-data/editing-parcels/tangent-curve.htm you can enter curves via the Tangent Curve dialog. The following assumes that you do have tangent data available. For each curve, you need the direction of the tangent to the curve, the arc length, the curve radius, and L/R (left or right). You would actually ...


1

For the particular call you've provided, try this this format: in the Traverse window, select the Direction-Distance from the drop down menu, then enter Direction: S01-41-46W Distance: 25 Hopefully the Add button won't be grayed out.


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