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41

GPS Visualizer will take a Google Map route (url) and convert to .gpx "You can ignore most the options, just select Gpx and paste the Google Maps URL into the box labelled “provide the URL of a file on the Web” and then press the Convert button" http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input Guide http://bedsforcyclists.co.uk/articles/2014/04/13/how-...


25

Hang on surely Rudolph knows where to go. He's been doing it for years.


16

Often it is good to address the need that is stated rather than answering the question that was asked. I would like only to point out that there is a well-known parallel solution that neatly circumvents all the technical computing issues: Santa has helpers. These agents work asynchronously and independently to identify the houses that need visits and carry ...


13

To export a route to KML you'll have to use Google MyMaps. add a route to new or existing layer drag and drop the route to suit your needs Open the maps options menue (3 dots above the layers) Export to KML You can then use any service to convert the KML to GPX. I prefer GPSies. (edit: now acquired by AllTrails)


11

Contraction Hierarchy is a very fast algorithm: http://algo2.iti.kit.edu/1087.php This algorithm is RAM friendly while executing a query (to hold a contracted graph some more RAM is necessary as well as massive preprocessing) There are some other algorithms - including the ones that solve public transit routing: http://i11www.iti.uni-karlsruhe.de/members/...


10

I have not used ArcGIS Schematics for more than some quick demos quite a few years ago, but there is a blog posting on Create route maps with the ArcGIS Schematics extension that may provide a solution.


10

Just to close this loose end, since I asked the question a new package was released called osmar which contains a vignette of how to implement shortest path algorithms in R using Open Street Map data: http://osmar.r-forge.r-project.org/ . It uses the function get.shortest.paths from the igraph package. Excellent article on this can be found here: http://...


8

I think that the type of software you are looking for is called a chart plotter software. There are several solutions used in navigation, where using a laptop is more and more common. I will not list here the solutions using dedicated hardware (AIS/navigation systems for example). Amongst paying options you have the "best seller" called MaxSea (http://www....


8

The link given by MappaGnosis is the first attempt to implement Graph theory algorithms in Python (by Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python). Since, many modules were developed: Graph theory network routing network One of the most comprehensive is NetworkX, mentioned before in GS it can read or write shapefiles natively (thanks to bwreilly in ...


8

It may seem like laziness on the part of Watershed tool developers to stick with the simplest and oldest flow algorithm, D8, but there is a very sound reason for doing so. The difference between the D8/Rho8 flow algorithm and the more advanced algorithms that you mention (e.g. D-infinity) is mainly in their inability to represent the dispersion of overland ...


8

the grass algorithm v.net.alloc can produce the subnets - you can call it from the Processing toolbox (tested in QGIS 2.16) You'll need a point layer (for facilities) and a lines layer with costs (either time/length). It'll create a new line layer with a field called cat added, which will be the id of the nearest facility. Here's an example based on ...


7

You could have a look at the Targomo API (formerly Route360˚), a pretty simple but powerful JS library which you can use with Leaflet (or even Google maps if you like). It adds travel time polygons to your map for the travel times you require (e.g. 10, 20, 60 minutes) and for the following travel modes: walk, bike, car, transit. There are quite a few ...


7

You can use GraphHopper for that task, which also supports different mode like walking or biking and uses OpenStreetMap per default. You'll need some Java coding which explores the road network from the starting point similar to how the Dijkstra algorithms works but then you can get something like the following even in real time (<0.5s): The code will ...


7

The following is what I am using. Some of it is specific to our deployment environment since we are using docker and some bash scripts to deploy and set up the server. You could easily get rid of all the argeparse/os.getenv and hardcode the connection if you wanted. import argparse from os import getenv import psycopg2 parser = argparse.ArgumentParser() ...


6

osrm-isochrone is a small node.js library for generating drivetimes.


6

OSM has a page dedicated to routing, which is worth going over: http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Routing There is a special tool for importing OSM data into a PGRouting system and generating the required structure: https://github.com/pgRouting/osm2pgrouting Lastly, there is a workshop tutorial on getting routing working with OSM data here: http://...


6

You can extract types with v.extract and then patch them with v.patch.


6

The only practical way is to add the 'missing' routes the data yourself. OSM probably shouldn't be putting parking lots into its walking routes. There are liability issues with adding routes that aren't real, properly maintained pedestrian paths. A parking lot, though walkable, could be dangerous and could be private property. You'll have similar issues with ...


6

The question has been asked before on Stack Overflow: Find all paths between two graph nodes; and Graph Algorithm To Find All Connections Between Two Arbitrary Vertices


6

This is something you can probably solve by using the Warshal's or Dijkstra's algorithm Although the number of houses in the world is way too big it would take a long time to compute that, I think this is a good initial point. Now I don't have the time to explain them but i give you an initial point. I'll go out with my family now and maybe I'll go back to ...


6

We are working on a multimodal routing for Austria (also for pedestrians). What I can say till now: You need the data: It took at least 4 years and even longer to collect all the necessary walkways, barriers, steps, opening times, streets, railways, bikeways, ferrys, and, and and...and its still going on You need a router which can interprete theses graphs ...


6

I think you need to build another table that defines all the routes in is as combinations of other routes. Then you query this table and join to the actual routes to get the geometry. If the query is for 'from station' to 'to station' and each section has a 'from station and 'to station'. But you want to include routes that take in multiple sections, you ...


6

As far as I know it's not possible to solve for alternate routes without some additional input or change to the analysis. In a network, given a particular impedance, there is only one shortest route between two points. As soon as you start looking for alternates without any additional input you've essentially removed the 'shortest' constraint and are back to ...


6

As an answer to both Uffe Kousgaard comments about "what the 18GB file contains" compared to a routable shapefile, and a possible answer to this question: You don't explicitly state it, but I guess you used the ArcGIS Editor for OpenStreetMap to convert your data. If not, I really recommend to have a look at it, as it contains a dedicated option to create ...


6

The issue is that the createMarker function is called for every waypoint, so obviously the resulting markers will look the same. To work around it, you simply use the arguments that you already have. Someone had a similar issue just a month ago: https://github.com/perliedman/leaflet-routing-machine/issues/13 I'm quoting perliedman, the creater of the routing ...


5

You might want to check out the open Route360° JavaScript API, which works with both Leaflet and Google maps. It returns travel time polygons for the following travel modes: walk, bike, car, transit. It is free and open source and coverage is pretty good. You can find a lot of different tutorials on how to use it on the website.


5

This problem is one of optimization. As such, let's express the objective and the constraints. I will formulate this in a dual manner: rather than thinking of the objective as achieving full coverage of the network, let's consider this as a constraint and make the objective be that of minimizing the total cost to achieve that coverage. Thus, the objective ...


5

Bearing in mind Sean's answer (that you have to add 'missing' pats yourself) as well as that these missing parts technically are parts of road-graph which are in turn are just lines, here is the quick'n'dirty workaround you may use. If the walking path has a common point with a "walkable" polygon, export this polygon's border as a line into your road-graph (...


5

I would start with the OpenStreetMap Wiki. From there, I would say that pgRouting is one of the more popular OS DB routing tools. If going with the pgRouting approach, OSM2PO is a popular way of creating the sql import statements for large regions of OSM data, as I heard that the usual database import utility used with pgRouting, osm2pgrouting, has trouble ...


5

With a bit of comparison you can: detect the point clicked find the feature closest to this point use the selectFeatureControl to programatically select this feature see: http://jsfiddle.net/XfEmn/ (note, I use underscore.js _.min function, you could of course do this with a foor loop etc, the clue is to loop the features and get the one with the ...


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