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119

No plugin required There is a core functionality XYZ Tile Server provider which was implemented with some other nice UX enhancements for tiled services (available since QGIS 2.18). This means, that there is no need for an external plugin although for an easy setup you can still use external plugins (see bottom of this post) and it offers various ...


113

Update 2019: No plugin needed, see new answer: https://gis.stackexchange.com/a/217670/187 Update 2015: A new plugin with even more background map options is QuickMapServices Original: Use the OpenLayers plugin to get Google Maps, Bing, OSM or Yahoo background maps. Note that these layers are NOT SUITABLE FOR PRINTING! (see open tickets in the answer to ...


50

Another plugin to add basemaps in QGIS - QuickMapServices: QGIS Python Plugins Repository: https://plugins.qgis.org/plugins/quick_map_services/ More info about plugin: http://nextgis.ru/en/blog/quickmapservices/ http://nextgis.ru/en/blog/quickmapservices-with-contributed-services/ http://nextgis.ru/en/blog/quickmapservices-in-gray/ http://nextgis.ru/en/...


31

This is an intrinsic feature of ArcGIS. Just open "Geographic Coordinate Systems" folder, then the "Solar System" folder, then choose "Mars" and the datum associated with your data.


10

Instead of trying to zoom to layer you need to use the georeferencing toolbar to display your .jpg Once you have the .jpg in your table of contents, navigate to where your image will be georeferenced (assuming you have a basemap) you can then open the drop-down and select fit to display: This will center the image on your screen allowing you to start the ...


9

There are plenty of free and/or commercial alternative base maps, aka "Tile Sources / Servers". A very nice live demo is available here, which lists many of the "free" ones: https://leaflet-extras.github.io/leaflet-providers/preview/ Contains configurations for various free tile providers — OSM, OpenCycleMap, Stamen, Esri, etc. However, "free" does not ...


9

Let me quote from https://www.mapbox.com/api-documentation/#maps : If you use Mapbox.js, Mapbox GL JS, or another library like Leaflet, you're already using this API. This documentation is geared toward software developers who want to programmatically read these resources: it isn't necessary to read or understand this reference to design or use ...


8

It seems that I found a solution after some trial and error, i.e. simply use a map's layers collection, and insert layer to the head position: var layers = map.getLayers(); layers.insertAt(0,layer);


8

This is a cool tool that lets you check out different basemap providers and gives you the references to the tiles for your code. It's based on leaflet but could still be helpful to you. leaflet basemap provider demo


8

Definitely not endorsed, but you can do this approach: Add an XYZ tile source for the Google Maps layer: http://mt0.google.com/vt/lyrs=y&hl=en&x={x}&y={y}&z={z}&s=Ga Add the layer to your map, zoom to desired region Right click the layer, Save As Set format to GeoTIFF Untick "Create VRT" Enter a filename Under Extent, click "Map view ...


7

If you're looking to add the ESRI basemaps to QGIS, follow the steps in this blogpost using the QGIS Python console: Copy and paste this code into the QGIS Python Console: Adds ESRI_Imagery_World_2D service: qgis.utils.iface.addRasterLayer("http://server.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/rest/services/ESRI_Imagery_World_2D/MapServer?f=json&pretty=true","raster"...


7

Yes, this is definitely possible, here's an example: <!doctype html> <html lang="en"> <head> <meta charset="utf-8"> <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7,IE=9" /> <meta name="viewport" content="initial-scale=1, maximum-scale=1,user-scalable=no"/> <title></title> <link rel="...


7

This can be done using the Quick Map Services plugin, which I'm finding better than the OpenLayers plugin for base maps - it has more base maps and loads tiles directly rather than using Javascript to pull in the HTML for a region that then loads the tiles. It also produces base map layers that work better with Map Composer windows, where the OpenLayers ...


7

Cartographic Boundary Shapefiles should be what you want and they should load faster than a web-based layer. Also you can delete any states you don't want. There is also the Tiger/Line Shapefile database you can choose which products you want to download. Since you are new to QGIS the steps would be to 1) download and extract the files 2) add the .shp file ...


7

QGIS is a very good tool for cartography. It is in my mind the best choice to make a nice looking map in not too much time. You'll have to learn GIS basics though before you're able to set everything up correctly. There are lots of resources to be found in this question/answer. Note that it's an older post and some of QGIS' features have evolved quite a ...


6

I believe I got it. I forced a mean +-2 Standard Deviation histogram stretch in each RapidEye image during the conversion to 8bit. I used a python script to identify the image min, max, average and SD. I then set the value of mean - 2SD (or image min, whichever was higher) to 2 and mean + 2SD (or max) to 254. And just to be safe, the original value of zero ...


6

I figured out how to add base maps from Google without the QuickMapServices plugin. The link I was trying to use as a WMS connection is actually for XYZ tiles. QGIS 3.0 has a great new feature, the Data Source Manager, which makes it easy to add pretty much any type of layer except XYZ tiles. So at first I thought that XYZ tiles weren't available in QGIS, ...


6

tl;dr; The performance of all basemaps from arcgis.com inside ArcMap will pretty much be equal. The basemaps you reference all come from the same cloud infrastructure and show the same thing: static images. (png, jpg, etc). In short, the only potential performance difference you may encounter is how long it takes to download the cached tiles of one ...


5

In QGIS 2.4, the OpenLayers Plugin has been moved to the Web menu instead of the Plugins pull-down menu. But if you've just upgraded from an earlier version of QGIS, be sure to upgrade OpenLayers Plugin as well.


5

Matplotlib Basemap has the ability to transform between coordinate systems. Have a look here. That page says: In order to plot data on a map, the coordinates of the data must be given in map projection coordinates. Calling a Basemap class instance with the arguments lon, lat will convert lon/lat (in degrees) to x/y map projection coordinates (in meters)....


5

Don't do: plot(mpma$long,mpma$lat) do plot(mpma) What you've done gets the long and lat values and plots them like they are any two vectors in R, like you were making a scatterplot. If you plot the object then R goes "Ooh, its a spatial object, I better treat it right" and sets up the axes correctly for a map.


5

Change default tmap_mode('plot') to tmap_mode('view'): library(tmap) data("NLD_prov") tmap_mode('view') tm_shape(NLD_prov) + tm_polygons('population') + tm_layout(basemaps = c('OpenStreetMap')) You can also call basemaps by URL: tm_shape(NLD_prov) + tm_polygons('population') + tm_layout(basemaps = 'https://mt1.google.com/vt/lyrs=m&x={x}&y={y}&...


4

Daniel, are these images from very different seasons? Or times of day? If they are different seasons, then getting good color balance may be pretty tough. But if they are different times of day, then applying a correction for sun angle may help noticably. A good first order approximation for sun angle is to multiply the pixels times 1.0/cos(...


4

There is no organized catalog of XYZ tile servers per se. The closest thing is the leaflet-providers project which provides dozens of free basemaps. Code for integrating with leaflet is provided but it should be relatively easy to translate to OpenLayers or other mapping clients.


4

You could use the data frame clipping option. This allows you to clip certain layers to a polygon extent. It is located in Data Frame Properties -> Data Frame tab at the bottom. By default, it applies this clip to all layers, so you might have to go in and only select the layers you want clipped.


4

You can find a list of free WMS and TMS services here: http://josm.openstreetmap.de/wiki/Maps Written to use in the JOSM editor, it should not be too difficult to get the essential information out of it for other software that offers WMS or TMS.


4

You can use ESRI imagery in QGIS, just add it as a WMTS: Add WMS/WMTS Layer > NEW > enter a Name and the URL below, press OK > Connect > select a Tileset and Add it to the map http://services.arcgisonline.com/arcgis/rest/services/World_Imagery/MapServer/WMTS/1.0.0/WMTSCapabilities.xml


4

There is a little arrow in the bottom right of each custom baselayer thumbnail; click it and select "Remove Base Layer".


4

The reason why it doesn't work is because the arguments for is_land(xin, yin) are referencing the grid, and aren't latitudinal and longitudinal coordinates, they're simply the index values. Since is_land(xin, yin) takes index values and not lat/long coordinates, you need to find out the index values on the map for the coordinates you're interested in. map =...


4

Found this example that is the can be modified to set the blank base map in open layer 3 http://openlayers.org/en/v3.7.0/examples/lazy-source.html


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